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June 17, 2016

TEMA Seeks Catastrophic Exercise Volunteers to Simulate Real-World Need


The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) is joining with the Tennessee Volunteer Organizations Active in Disasters (TNVOAD) for a catastrophic disaster simulation exercise where key resources are activated to assist with community recovery.


In the exercise, TNVOAD will establish a Volunteer Reception Center (VRC) and a Point of Distribution (POD), from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m., CDT, on Thursday, June 23, 2016, at the American Legion Post 88, 2864 Elm Hill Pike in Donelson, and operate both as if a real disaster had occurred.


TNVOAD needs volunteers who would like to play victims of a disaster and who want learn more about how they can actually work in a disaster to help survivors.


“This is a rare opportunity to learn what to expect if you are a survivor of a disaster and what resources are available to help get you through that time,” said David Sledge, TNVOAD executive committee member. “There will be several TNVOAD organizations participating at this event so volunteers will also be helping these organizations practice for a real event.”


Volunteers just need to come to the VRC and POD location in Donelson between 12 p.m. and 3 p.m., CDT, and let TNVOAD know they would like to learn about working with the organization or what resources would be available.


For more information, send an email to David Sledge, david.sledge@tn.gov, or visit TNVOAD at tnvoad.shutterfly.com.


The community volunteer recovery event is part of TEMA’s annual catastrophic exercise, known as TNCAT ’16 (pronounced TEN-CAT for Tennessee Catastrophic Exercise). TNCAT is an annual, large-scale disaster planning event used to enhance the coordination and communication among local, state and private sector entities. The TNCAT exercise moves to a different region of the state each year, and past exercises have simulated catastrophic earthquakes, wildfires and winter storms.


ABOUT TEMA
TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.


April 22, 2016

East Tennessee Wildfire Status 4-22-16


Please see the update below on the status of the wildfires in East Tennessee. There are no actives fires at this time and there are no new fires posing a threat. A number of fires are still being monitoring until declared as out. TEMA will remain at Level IV – Elevated through the weekend for updates on the monitored fires.


2016 East Tennessee Spring Wildfires
April 22, 2016


This report provides details of wildfires where the Tennessee Department of Agriculture Division of Forestry (TDF) has active involvement and may not include fires worked solely by the USDA Forest Service or local departments.


Weather Forecast
A WEAK COLD FRONT WILL PUSH THROUGH THE AREA THIS AFTERNOON AND EVENING…THEN EXIT TO THE EAST. A RIDGE OF HIGH PRESSURE WILL BUILD OVER THE REGION FOR THE WEEKEND.
Burn Permits are being issued by phone today in the 24 counties of the East Tennessee District.


Fire Status


New Fires
No new fires.


Active Fires
No active fires at this time.


Monitored Fires (All fires will be monitored until declared out.)

Glades Rd. Fire (Sevier)
• Size: 7 acres
• Containment: 100%
• Other: 1 structure lost.

Little White Oak Rd. Fire (Campbell)
• Size: 100+ acres
• Containment: 100%

French Hamby Rd #1 Fire (Morgan)
• Size: 60 acres
• Containment: 100%

French Hamby Rd #2 Fire (Morgan)
• Size: 2 acres
• Containment: 100%

Camp Austin Rd Fire (Morgan)
• Size: 10 acres
• Containment: 100%

Railroad Grade Fire (Carter) – Federal
• Size: 1500 acres
• Containment: 65%

Flatwood Road (Raccoon) Fire (Sullivan) – Federal
• Size: 285 acres
• Containment: 50%

Nelson Rd. Fire (Morgan)
• Size: 50 acres
• Containment: 100%

State Line Fire (Cocke) – Federal
• Size: 1068
• Containment: 90%

Mountain Rd Fire (Campbell)
• Size: 30 acres
• Containment: 100%

Hill Lane Fire (Campbell)
• Size: 6 acres
• Containment: 100%

Leatherwood Hollow Rd Fire (Claiborne)
• Size: 50 acres
• Containment: 100%
• Other: citation issued

Brodeo Rd Fire (Morgan)
• Size: 5
• Containment: 100%

Self Hollow Rd (Blount)
• Size: 40 acres
• Containment: 100%

Starr Mt. / White Cliff Fire (McMinn) – Cumberland District – Federal
• Size: 135 acres
• Containment: 100%

Roses Creek Fire (Claiborne)
• Size: 600 acres
• Containment: 100%

Gatlinburg Fire (Sevier)
• Size: 5 acres
• Containment: 100%

Bluff Mountain Fire (Sevier)
• Size: 153 acres
• Containment: 100%
• Other: 6 homes lost, 9 damaged

Shields Mountain Fire (Sevier)
• Size: 12 acres
• Containment: 100%

Rock Creek/Clairfield Fire (Claiborne)
• Size: 40 acres
• Containment: 100%

Cumberland Fire/Carr Gap Rd. (Claiborne)
• Size: 50 acres
• Containment: 100%

Powerline/Heaton Branch Fire (Carter)
• Size: 60 acres
• Containment: 100%


TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

April 19, 2016

Status of East Tennessee Wildfires


Below is an afternoon status update on the East Tennessee wildfires. The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency and Tennessee Department of Agriculture are receiving progress updates on containment of the current, active wildfires and are monitoring for any other outbreaks. The Tennessee Department of Military, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, U.S. Forestry and myriad local fire departments are engaged in the wildfire response. The State Emergency Operations Center remains at Level IV – Elevated status due to the continuing wildfire threat.


This report provides details of wildfires where the Tennessee Department of Agriculture Division of Forestry (TDF) has active involvement and may not include fires worked solely by the USDA Forest Service or local departments.


Weather Forecast

· Low relative humidity earlier today but expected to increase tonight to around 80%
· Precipitation expected Thursday night
· Burn permits were restricted today. Online permits were not issued and applicants were required to call for a permit. Callers were given a warning to be mindful about extremely low relative humidity expected throughout the day as well as winds on slopes.


​Active Wildfires

Old Railroad Grade Fire (Carter) – Federal
· Size: 400 acres
· Containment: spot fires beyond containment line forcing crews to cut new lines
· TDF Resources: 3 personnel, 1 pumper, 1 dozer
· Other: USDA Forest Service has assumed control of this fire

Cumberland Fire (Claiborne)
· Size: 50 acres, new 1 acre reset across the road
· Containment: 100%
· TDF Resources: 10 personnel, 2 engines, 4 dozers
· Other: backfire completed this morning; new set discovered at 1513 called in.

State Line Fire (Sevier) – Federal
· Size: 400+ acres; after backfire it could be ~1000 acres
· Containment: 30%
· Federal Resources: 125 personnel, 2 engines, 2 dozers, 1 helicopter
· Other: HWY 25/70 is closed to through traffic. It will reopen as soon as it is safe for travel.

Flatwood Road Fire (Sullivan)
· Size: 40+ acres
· Containment: no estimate
· TDF Resources: 11 personnel, 3 engines, 2 dozers

​Starr Mt. / White Cliff Fire (McMinn) – Cumberland District
· Size: 80 acres
· Containment: 30%
· TDF Resources: 11 state 5 federal, 2 state dozers, 1 federal


Inactive Wildfires

Gatlinburg Fire (Sevier)
· Size: 5 acres
· Containment: 100%
· TDF Resources: none
· Other: Near main road leading into Gatlinburg

Powerline Fire (Carter)
· Size: 60 acres
· Containment: 100%
· TDF Resources: none

Roses Creek Fire (Claiborne)
· Size: 600 acres
· Containment: 100%
· TDF Resources: none
· Other: backfire completed last night

Rock Creek/Clairfield Fire (Claiborne)
· Size: 40 acres
· Containment: 100%
· TDF Resources: none

Buffalo (Claiborne)
· Size: 60 acres
· Containment: 100%
· TDF Resources: none

Bluff Mountain Fire (Sevier)
· Size: 150 acres
· Containment: 100%
· TDF Resources: none
· Other:
· 6 homes lost, 9 damaged
· Concerned about eastern flank holding with predicted winds.

Shields Mountain Fire (Sevier)
· Size: 12 acres
· Containment: 100%
· TDF Resources: none
· Other: Steep terrain

Nydeck Road Fire (Morgan)
· Size: 30 acres
· Containment: 100%
· TDF Resources: none

Cassell Road (Morgan)
· Size: 25 acres
· Containment: 100%
· TDF Resources: none

Highway 27 (Morgan)
· Size: 20 acres
· Containment: 100%
· TDF Resources: none

Seedtick Road (Morgan)
· Size: 2 acres
· Containment: 100%
· TDF Resources: none


Basic Wildfire Safety

• Obey burn bans.
• Avoid activities that cause open flames or sparks.
• Properly discard cigarettes – do not throw them from vehicles.
• If you smell smoke or see fire, move in a direction opposite the fire immediately.
• If you see a wildfire and haven’t received evacuation orders yet, call 9-1-1. Don’t assume that someone else has already called.
• If ordered to evacuate during a wildfire, do it immediately- make sure and tell someone where you are going and when you have arrived.
• Know where to go. If you are ordered to evacuate, know the route to take and have plan of where you will go. Check-in with your friends and family.
• Many communities have text or email alerting systems for emergency notifications. To find out what alerts are available in your area, search the Internet with your town, city, or county name and the word “alerts.”
• If you or someone you are with has been burned, call 9-1-1 or seek help immediately; cool and cover burns to reduce chance of further injury or infection.
• Monitor TV and Radio. You’ll get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.
• Keep your car fueled, in good condition, and stocked with emergency supplies and a change of clothes.


TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

April 18, 2016

TEMA Update :: Wildfire Threat Continues in East Tennessee


The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency is stepping up to a Level 4 – Elevated status, as of 5 p.m., CST, today (4-18-16) due to a number of wildfires burning in East Tennessee that are threatening lives and property.


Cocke County
On April 17, 2016, Cocke County EMA reported a large wild land fire in Cocke County on Weavers Bend. Approximately 400 acres have burned and there are 10 to15 homes that could potentially be impacted, but they are not currently in danger and have not been evacuated. Approximately 100 personnel are on scene. This is a different fire than the Halls Top Fire in Cocke County that started around on April 4, 2016 and burned over 2,000 acres.


Sevier County
Three separate fires are burning in Sevier County. A fire on Bluff Mountain began as a structure fire and has burned approximately 100 acres with six homes impacted and 30 homes were evacuated. The fire is reported as 100% contained. A second fire on Shell Mountain of around 15 acres is reported 100 percent contained. A third fire is currently underway near Gatlinburg.


Carter County
Two fires are reported in Carter County reports two wildfires burning on Old Railroad Grade Road (up to 40 acres burned) and the Elk Mills Fire, which is toward Roane Mountain.


A combination of State Forestry, U.S. Forestry and local fire resources are managing and responding to these wildfires. TEMA has deployed District Coordinators from its East Tennessee office to the fires and is also sending staff from the Middle and West offices for supportive efforts as the fire response goes to 24-hour operational periods. The Tennessee Highway Patrol and
Tennessee Department of Transportation are also monitoring and supporting the wildfire response.


Rain isn’t expected in East Tennessee until later this week, with rainfall amounts only in the one-half-inch range.


Basic Wildfire Safety

• Obey burn bans.
• Avoid activities that cause open flames or sparks.
• Properly discard cigarettes – do not throw them from vehicles.
• If you smell smoke or see fire, move in a direction opposite the fire immediately.
• If you see a wildfire and haven’t received evacuation orders yet, call 9-1-1. Don’t assume that someone else has already called.
• If ordered to evacuate during a wildfire, do it immediately- make sure and tell someone where you are going and when you have arrived.
• Know where to go. If you are ordered to evacuate, know the route to take and have plan of where you will go. Check-in with your friends and family.
• Many communities have text or email alerting systems for emergency notifications. To find out what alerts are available in your area, search the Internet with your town, city, or county name and the word “alerts.”
• If you or someone you are with has been burned, call 9-1-1 or seek help immediately; cool and cover burns to reduce chance of further injury or infection.
• Monitor TV and Radio. You’ll get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.
• Keep your car fueled, in good condition, and stocked with emergency supplies and a change of clothes.


TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

April 5, 2016

TEMA Watching Wildfire Threat in East Tennessee, Providing Response Assistance


The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency is stepping up to a Level 4 – Elevated status, as of 5 p.m., CST, today (4-5-16) due to a number of wild-land fires in East Tennessee that are threatening lives and property.


A wildfire in Cocke County has already impacted 800 to 1,000 acres of land and is threatening an additional 1,000 to 2,000 acres, with up to 20 homes in its path. The fire is located on Halls Top mountain, southeast of Newport, Tenn., in the Cherokee National Forest. U.S. Forest Service and Tennessee Division of Forestry are responding, with an estimated 100 personnel at the scene utilizing fixed-wing aircraft and helicopter support for fire suppression.


TEMA has deployed District Coordinators from the East Region Office to the Halls Top fire and is sending additional District Coordinators from its Middle Region Office also to assist. There is limited access into the Pleasant Grove community due to heavy equipment and fire personnel in the area. The Tennessee Department of Military, Tennessee Highway Patrol and Tennessee Department of Transportation are also engaged and ready to assist the response efforts.


Additionally, local officials reported wildfires today in Scott, Morgan and Sevier counties. In Sevier County, on English Mountain, 16 fire crews responded to a wildfire that caused 30 residents to be evacuated from their homes. A second fire in Sevier County resulted yesterday from the helicopter crash that claimed five lives. In Morgan County, two fires impacted about 200 acres and another 100 acres burned in Scott County.


Basic Wildfire Safety

- Obey burn bans.
- Avoid activities that cause open flames or sparks.
- Properly discard cigarettes – do not throw them from vehicles.
- If you smell smoke or see fire, move in a direction opposite the fire immediately.
- If you see a wildfire and haven’t received evacuation orders yet, call 9-1-1. Don’t assume that someone else has already called.
- If ordered to evacuate during a wildfire, do it immediately – make sure and tell someone where you are going and when you have arrived.
- Know where to go. If you are ordered to evacuate, know the route to take and have plan of where you will go. Check-in with your friends and family.
- Many communities have text or email alerting systems for emergency notifications.To find out what alerts are available in your area, search the Internet with your town, city, or county name and the word “alerts.”
- If you or someone you are with has been burned, call 9-1-1 or seek help immediately; cool and cover burns to reduce chance of further injury or infection.
- Monitor TV and Radio. You’ll get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.
- Keep your car fueled, in good condition, and stocked with emergency supplies and a change of clothes.


TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

March 10, 2016

TEMA at Level IV-Elevated for Heavy Rain and Flooding Potential


The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency is at Level IV-Elevated, as of 4 p.m., CST, today to monitor a severe weather system bringing flash flooding, river flooding and heavy rain to the state. The system moved into West Tennessee today and will be crossing Tennessee through the weekend.


The National Weather Service in West Tennessee has reported heavy rain in counties along the Mississippi River and predicts another 3 to 5 inches of rainfall through the weekend for the area. Flash Flood Warnings are also in effect in Fayette, Gibson, Hardeman, Haywood, Lauderdale, Madison, Shelby and Tipton counties.


Local officials in a few northwest Middle Tennessee counties have reported flooding on roads and rising water along small streams. Another 1 to 3 inches of rain is expected through this evening in areas of Middle Tennessee. A Flood Warning currently is in place in Stewart, Houston, Humphreys and Montgomery counties through 9:30 p.m., CST.


Showers will begin Friday in East Tennessee and thunderstorms are possible through the weekend.


Flood Preparedness Tips – TURN AROUND, DON’T DROWN

• NEVER drive through standing water. It only takes about 2 feet of water to float a full-sized automobile.
• STAY out of high water, if at all possible, since only 6 inches of fast-moving water can knock a person down.
• Flood water can also be contaminated or electrically charged.
• If it has been raining hard for several hours, or steadily raining for several days, be alert to the possibility for flooding.
• Close monitor local weather forecasts or NOAA Weather Radio for forecast and flood information.
• Follow the instructions of local officials. If advised to relocate due to high water, do so immediately.
• Do not drive around barricades. They are there for safety reasons.
• Move to higher ground away from rivers, streams, creeks and storm drains.
• Stay away from downed power lines to avoid electrocution.


Don’t forget to set your clocks forward 1 hour this weekend for Daylight Savings Time.

TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

February 26, 2016

Haslam Announces SBA Disaster Declaration for Six Tennessee Counties from December 2015 Severe Weather Impact


Low-Interest Loans Available to Residents in Wayne and its Surrounding Counties


Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today announced the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has granted a disaster declaration for Wayne County due to impacts in the county from the severe storms, tornadoes and heavy precipitation that occurred Dec. 23-28, 2015.


The declaration also includes the surrounding counties of Decatur, Hardin, Lawrence, Lewis and Perry in Tennessee, as well as Alabama’s Lauderdale County.


“These storms left incredible devastation across multiple counties, and access to the SBA’s disaster loans will help these citizens, individual homeowners, renters and business owners begin the recovery process much faster,” Haslam said.


Those affected have until April 25, 2016 to apply for assistance for physical damage and until Nov. 25, 2016 to apply for relief from economic injury.


The interest rates for homeowners will be 1.813 percent for those without established credit, and 3.625 percent for those with established credit. Interest rates for businesses will be 4 percent for those without established credit, and 6 percent for businesses with established credit.


The SBA is opening a temporary office to help homeowners and businesses with the disaster loan process. The SBA office will operate from March 1-8, closed on Sunday, and will be located at the Lutts Fire Department, 8111 Lutts Road in Wayne County.


More information is available through the SBA’s Disaster Assistance Customer Service Center at (800) 659-2955, by email disastercustomerservice@sba.gov, or by visiting SBA’s Web site at www.sba.gov/disaster.


A joint Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) and SBA damage survey identified more than 27 homes in Wayne County that sustained major damage from the severe weather.


On Dec. 23, 2015, a severe weather system brought storms, tornadoes, and heavy rain to Tennessee, and continued through Dec. 25, 2015. A second rain system impacted the state on Dec. 28, 2015. The severe weather systems resulted in damage to homes, businesses and public facilities in multiple counties, and caused six confirmed fatalities.

TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

TEMA Encourages Tennesseans to be Severe Weather Aware


Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has declared Feb. 28, to Mar. 5, 2016, as Severe Weather Awareness Week to encourage all Tennesseans to make planning and preparing for severe weather a priority.


Throughout the week, a number of organizations at the local, state and federal levels will conduct educational activities across the state with a goal of helping people prevent injuries and fatalities due to the hazards severe weather can present: tornadoes, damaging winds, flash floods, lightning and hail.


“It is imperative that individuals, families, businesses, and communities be ready now before severe weather is upon them,” said Deputy Commissioner David Purkey of the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA). “We are pleased to have so many State departments, county emergency officials and private sector partners working with TEMA to push out information, resources and tools to make it easy to get prepared.”


For its part, TEMA is announcing a new partnership with the Outdoor Advertising Association of Tennessee (OAAT) to provide important information on donated digital billboard space during disasters and emergencies.


Through the OAAT partnership, TEMA will be able to target messages to the 183 digital billboards OAAT members currently have in place across the state. The messages can be delivered to a digital billboard in a specific geographic area or to multiple digital billboards for a widespread event.

“Protecting the public in emergencies is a shared concern of everyone and OAAT members want to play a major role in helping the public receive vital information before or after any type of disaster,” said Bill Rush, OAAT executive director.


TEMA may use the digital billboards to post information about evacuation routes, shelter locations, road closures, helpful phone numbers, recovery activities or other relevant information important to the public in a disaster-impacted area.


“Tennessee faces a multitude of man-made, natural and technological threats, “ Purkey said. “When a disaster is imminent or immediately after it occurs, it is imperative to relay timely, accurate and helpful information to the general public so they know how to help and protect themselves.”


National Weather Service (NWS) Hosts Awareness and Education Events
The NWS is planning a series of education and training events, using each day of Severe Weather Awareness Week to focus on a different severe weather threat. A highlight of the week will be the statewide tornado drill at 9:30 a.m., CST, on Wed., Mar. 2.


“Knowing what to do and having a plan during any kind of severe weather is essential for Tennesseans,” said Krissy Hurley, warning coordination meteorologist with NWS Nashville. “It’s not if the next severe weather event will occur; it’s merely a question of when.”


The NWS event schedule is as follows, and available at www.srh.noaa.gov/ohx/?n=swaw2016:

• Sat., Feb. 27

o Severe Weather Awareness Day at Trevecca Nazarene University, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., CST, in Nashville

• Sun., Feb. 28

o Important Role of SKYWARN Spotters

• Mon., Feb.29

o Severe Thunderstorms and the Devastating Effects of Severe Storms

• Tue., Mar. 1

o Lightning, the Underrated Killer
o Tennessee’s NWS offices will hold a Twitter question and answer session at 6 p.m., CST.

• Wed., Mar. 2

o Tornado Safety and Preparedness
o Statewide Tornado Drill at 9:30 a.m., CST, including a test of the NOAA Weather Radio System
o Tennessee’s NWS Offices host a Severe Weather Preparedness Google Hangout session at 6:30 p.m., CST.

• Thurs., Mar. 3

o Hazards of Flooding and Flash Floods
o NWS will issue Spring Flood Outlook at 10 a.m., CST.
o NOAA Weather Radio programming event, from 3:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., CST, at Electronic Express, 5308 Nolensville Road in Nashville

• Fri., Mar. 4

o NOAA Weather Radio and The Emergency Alert System
o Back-up day for statewide tornado drill and social media events if there is severe weather on Wed., Mar. 2.


“Emergency Managers all across the state are always planning for inclement weather, because we know it can happen at a moment’s notice,” said John Mathews, Sevier County Emergency Management director and president of the Emergency Management Association of Tennessee (EMAT).


“Every year, we look forward to Severe Weather Awareness Week as it allows us to educate the public on the importance of being prepared,” Mathews said. “Each year, several people are killed or seriously injured by severe storms, and these storms affect everyone no matter their socioeconomic status. So, EMAT encourages everyone to learn how to prepare themselves and their homes for bad weather and practice the plan frequently.”


Tennessee Department of Commerce & Insurance Says Update Home Insurance Policies
The Tennessee Department of Commerce & Insurance urges consumers to use Severe Weather Awareness Week as a valuable opportunity to make sure their home insurance policies are updated and that they have a current inventory of all their home’s belongings in the event of an emergency.


“Homeowners should always keep pictures and/or receipts for all contents on their property in case they experience an emergency,” Tennessee Department of Commerce & Insurance Julie Mix McPeak said. “It’s a good habit to update the inventory at least once a year and store it in a safe place outside the home such as a safe deposit box. “


Digital tools such as the National Association of Insurance Commissioner’s (NAIC) MyHome Scr.APP.book smartphone application allows homeowners to capture images and descriptions of belongings to help determine how much insurance you need and for filing a claim. The app makes it easier for consumers to document their valuables, update their inventories and store the information for easy access.


Tennessee Department of Health
The Department of Health reminds Tennesseans that everyone has a responsibility to be prepared for severe weather. Individuals, families and businesses are urged to make plans for responding to disasters as the best way to protect their health, safety and prosperity.


“Don’t wait until a flood or storm strikes to think about what to do,” said TDH Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH. “All of us need to have a personal protection plan for ourselves and our families. That plan should include where to shelter if a tornado is heading your way, how you’ll contact loved ones if phones are out or you can’t return home and having resources to be self-sufficient for at least three days.”


TDH also offers opportunities for Tennesseans to show their volunteer spirit by participating as members of the state’s Medical Reserve Corps teams. MRC groups work in the community to support efforts to restore health and safety during and after emergencies. MRC volunteers receive orientation and training, and anyone can serve. Learn more at www.tnmrc.org/.


Tennessee Department of Safety & Homeland Security’s Road Safety Reminders
The Department of Safety and Homeland Security urges people to not travel when severe weather is a possibility. It is not necessary to take a risk that could put you or your loved ones in a dangerous weather related situation.

• Do not attempt to cross standing water that has obstructed a roadway. The water level may be deeper than perceived. Your vehicle will not overcome the power of water.
• Do not attempt to cross fallen power lines. These lines can be “hot” and could potentially cause severe injury or death.
• If you are caught in a vehicle during a severe weather event such as a Tornado, leave the vehicle and seek a low lying area or indoor shelter.
• Do not seek shelter under bridges or overpasses.
• Always be prepared! Stock your vehicle with blankets, snacks, water, flashlight, batteries, car phone charger and booster cables.
• Dial *THP (847) from your mobile phone to connect to a THP dispatch center if you need assistance.
• Make sure you have a full tank of gas.
• If a weather-related event is forecast, monitor the situation by watching your local media.
• Please visit the Department of Safety and Homeland Security social media outlets to receive the latest roadway conditions: Facebook, Tennessee Highway Patrol, and Twitter, @TNHighwayPatrol


Be Ready, Make a Plan, Have a Kit
The most important preparedness tip for severe weather is to stay informed to its potential. Listen to NOAA Weather Radio, watch TV or listen to the radio for weather updates and warnings.


Other severe weather awareness tips and resources include:

• Never venture into high water, either on foot or in a vehicle.
• If you’re outside and hear thunder, go indoors immediately.
• Know the location of and route to your office or building’s tornado shelter.
• Never try to outrun a tornado.
• Have an emergency plan ready at places where your family spends time: work, school, daycare, commuting and outdoor events.
• Emergency plans should include where to meet, and who family members should check in with, if you are separated from family members during a severe weather emergency.
• The website, www.ready.gov, has fill-in-the-blank plans available so individuals and families can assemble the information needed in a personal emergency plan.


At a minimum, emergency preparedness kits should include one gallon of water per day, per person and per pet, for up to three days. The kit should also have enough non-perishable food for each family member, and pets, for up to three days.


Other items that every kit should include are: a flashlight, battery-powered radio, extra batteries, first aid kit, personal hygiene items, cell phone charger or solar charger and copies of important family documents.


It is also very important that emergency kits contain extra supplies of medications, especially for those with chronic health conditions.


ABOUT TEMA
TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

February 2, 2016

TEMA Elevated to Monitor Impacts from Approaching Severe Storm Front


Current Situation
The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency is at Level IV – Elevated, as of 2 p.m. today, in preparation for a strong cold front that will be crossing into Tennessee and bringing with it the possibility of severe thunderstorms, straight-line damaging winds and isolated tornadoes.


West Tennessee and the Memphis area will see the leading edge of the front between noon and 6 p.m., CST, today, with 4 p.m., CST, being a primary period of concern in the western part of Tennessee. Middle Tennessee and the Nashville area could see front impacts after 4 p.m., CST, with 5 p.m., CST being a primary period of concern.


Weather Summary

• Strong to severe thunderstorms are Expected this afternoon
• Storm will begin to diminish after 1AM and further east as the storm moves
• Storms will begin to increase as the front crosses the Mississippi
• Damaging straight line winds will be the main threat along and West of I-65 within a 30 mile radius
• A few brief tornadoes possible with the squall line
• Strongest thunderstorms expected across western portions of Tennessee late
• Possible record high temps today


Preparedness Tips

• Monitor NOAA Weather Radio and local news broadcasts on radio and television for the latest weather conditions and forecasts.
• Determine in advance where you will take shelter in case of a tornado warning – storm cellars or basements provide the best protect, followed by an interior room on the lowest floor in your home.
• If in a high-rise building, go to a small, interior room on the lowest floor possible.
• A vehicle, trailer or mobile home does not provide good protection form tornadoes, plan to go quickly to a safe building with a strong foundation, if possible.
• If a shelter is not available, lie flat in a ditch or other low-lying area. Do not get under a bridge or overpass.
• Remember – When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors – Postpone outdoor activities if a thunderstorm is forecast.
• Secure objects that might blow away or cause damage.
• Secure outside doors and windows.
• After the threat passes, remain outside of any damaged buildings or structures, stay away from downed power lines.


TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

January 29, 2016

State of Emergency Ends in Tennessee


This is to provide notification the current State of Emergency in Tennessee will end at 3 p.m., CST, today, Jan. 29, 2015.


There are no life safety issues or hazards remaining from Tennessee’s recent severe winter storms.


The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) in Nashville now returns to Level V – Normal activation.


TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

January 23, 2016

TEMA Update on Severe Winter Weather, 12 p.m., CST, 1/23/16


Here is the latest update on the current situation from the severe winter storm in Tennessee. We expect to scale back personnel at the SEOC today to give personnel a chance to rest. The Level III State of Emergency will stay in place as very cold conditions will persist through the weekend in Tennessee and travel conditions remain very hazardous. This will be TEMA’s only update today unless there are significant developments.


CURRENT SITUATION
Tennessee remains at a Level III State of Emergency, declared at 3 p.m., CST, on Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016, from the heavy snowfall, ice and treacherous road conditions from a severe winter storm that began moving through late Thursday evening and Friday.


The winter storm is still impacting East Tennessee, and will for the remainder of Saturday, as snowfall has ceased in our western and middle regions. Very cold, below freezing temperatures will persist in Tennessee Saturday and Sunday so there will not be any melting. This means travel and road conditions will remain very hazardous, especially as temperatures fall further and roads re-freeze in the overnight hours.


TEMA encourages motorists to avoid travel or limit it if at all possible.


FORECAST

West: Saturday-Mostly sunny with a high of 32
Middle: Saturday-Partly sunny with high of 31
East: Saturday- Snow likely (70%) with high 29


FATALITIES & INJURIES
There are no confirmed reports of fatalities or injuries for this current State of Emergency. The Tennessee Department of Health has confirmed two fatalities during Wednesday’s winter weather of a 19-year-old male in Knox County, and a female of unknown age in Carter County. Both fatalities were the result of motor vehicle accidents.


POWER OUTAGES
There are reports of just above 780 people without power in Tennessee: Davidson County, 637; Fentress, 108; Picket, 21; Sumner, 16.


SHELTERS
Hancock County has opened its Rescue Squad headquarters as a shelter. Two warming shelters are open at Jellico High School and Caryville Elementary in Campbell County. One American Red Cross shelter is open in Montgomery County at the Seventh Day Adventist Church.


RESPONSE ACTIVITIES
Reports from County Emergency Managers in Tennessee’s East Region indicate response organizations are working a number of traffic issues, as well as providing emergency transportation for medical patients who need treatment for chronic conditions.


TEMA’s Regional Offices in Jackson, Nashville and Knoxville are monitoring county conditions in their regions and in contact with local Emergency Managers to gather situational information.


The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) in Nashville is currently operating in 24-hour rotational shifts with personnel from a number of State Agency partners, to include: Tennessee Department of Military, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster and Tennessee Department of Commerce & Insurance.


The SEOC is also maintaining contact with the Tennessee Department of Health, Tennessee Department of Human Services and American Red Cross for updates on human needs issues and planning.


The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Tennessee Division of Forestry have personnel and resources on standby to assist with any response activities.


PREPAREDNESS INFORMATION


AT HOME

• Be sure you have adequate clothing and blankets to keep you warm.
• Have sufficient heating fuel for your home.
• Store a good supply of dry, seasoned wood for your fireplace or wood-burning stove.
• Bring pets and companion animals inside during winter weather. Move other animals or livestock to sheltered areas with non-frozen drinking water.
• If pipes freeze, remove any insulation or layers of newspapers and wrap pipes in rags. Completely open all faucets and pour hot water over the pipes, starting where they were most exposed to the cold (or where the cold was most likely to penetrate).
• Maintain ventilation when using kerosene heaters to avoid build-up of toxic fumes. Refuel kerosene heaters outside and keep them at least three feet from flammable objects.
• Keep generators away from windows and doors, and out of garages.
• Do not bring propane gas or charcoal grills indoors, even into a garage, for cooking or heating.
• If you go outside, watch for signs of frostbite (loss of feeling and white or pale appearance in extremities) and hypothermia (uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness, and apparent exhaustion).
• Seek warm shelter and medical treatment immediately for frostbite and hypothermia symptoms.
• Don’t venture outdoors in slippery cold conditions without warm clothing, even for just a minute. A fall and prolonged exposure to cold can put your life in danger.


ON THE ROAD

• Have a winter safety kit in your car with water, food, first aid supplies, blankets, gloves, heavy boots, food, flashlight, extra batteries, and warning lights or flares.
• Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive. If your car gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along your predetermined route.
• Call *THP (*847) if you get stranded to be connected to the closest Tennessee Highway Patrol dispatch location.
• Call 511 for traffic information from the Tennessee Department of Transportation.
• Keep your gas tank at least half-full in threatening weather.
• Charge your cell phone before and while travelling.
• Dress for the weather and not the car ride, keep winter apparel and boots in your vehicle.


STAY INFORMED

• Listen to NOAA Weather Radio for winter weather watches and warnings.
• Monitor local radio and television stations for updates on weather and road conditions.
• Download the ReadyTN smartphone app to get weather, road conditions and emergency preparedness information on your smartphone.


TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

January 22, 2016

TEMA’s 5 p.m., CST, update on Tennessee’s Winter Storm


Updates below on the winter weather situation in Tennessee with special emphasis on the forecast for tonight and tomorrow, a caution to limit travel in the State due to cold temperatures re-freezing roadways, and tips on winter weather preparedness. This will be our final update of the evening unless there are significant developments overnight. The SEOC will continue to be staffed overnight and on Saturday with TEMA personnel and State Agency partners. -Dean


CURRENT SITUATION
Tennessee remains at a Level III – State of Emergency, declared at 3 p.m., CST, on Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016, as a major winter weather system continues its trek across Tennessee.


This is a very dangerous winter system that has made, and will continue to make, driving on Tennessee roadways treacherous.


Travel should be avoided or limited, especially as the temperatures drop this afternoon and overnight.


FORECAST

West – Winter Storm Warning in effect until 6 p.m., CST, with additional snow and sleet accumulations of less than one-inch. Locally-higher amounts are possible. Dangerous travel conditions are expected. Wind speeds could reach 20 to 25 m.p.h. bringing the threat of power outages and damage to property not secured.


Middle – Winter Storm Warning in effect for most of the region through Saturday morning. Snow continues though it should begin to taper off. A total of 6” to 10” of snow accumulation is possible across northern Middle Tennessee with 3” to 7” possible north of I-40 and east of I-65. In southern Middle Tennessee, snow totals of 1” and higher toward I-40 are possible. Area roadways will remain treacherous as temperatures remain below freezing.


East – A strong winter storm will impact the region this afternoon through Saturday morning with widespread, heavy, accumulating snowfall. Snow totals of 5” to 10” and above are possible along the Tennessee and Kentucky border. High winds in the region may create blizzard-like conditions. Travel is not advised as roadways will be hazardous.


FATALITIES & INJURIES
There are no confirmed reports of fatalities or injuries for this current State of Emergency. The Tennessee Department of Health has confirmed two fatalities during Wednesday’s winter weather of a 19-year-old male in Knox County, and a female of unknown age in Carter County. Both fatalities were the result of motor vehicle accidents.


POWER OUTAGES
There are reports of around 2,300 people without power in Tennessee. Davidson County reports 1,400 outages, followed by Montgomery County with 500; Cheatham, 115; Fentress, 72; Sumner, 67; Shelby, 62; and, Pickett, 48.


SHELTERS
Two warming shelters are open at Jellico High School and Caryville Elementary in Campbell County. One American Red Cross shelter is open in Montgomery County at the Seventh Day Adventist Church.


TEMA PRIORITIES

• Address life safety needs
• Support local government resource requests
• Assess and address roadway issues
• Monitor weather conditions
• Monitor for reports of stranded motorists


RESPONSE ACTIVITIES
The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) in Nashville is currently operating in 24-hour rotational shifts with personnel from a number of State Agency partners.


TEMA’s Regional Offices in Jackson, Nashville and Knoxville are staffed and engaged in gathering information from counties and working with State Agencies in their regions for situational awareness and response coordination.


The Tennessee Department of Transportation is continuing ice and snow emergency response roadway activities statewide and is responding to local requests for assistance.


Volunteer Organizations Active in Disasters (VOAD) has multiple teams on standby statewide to support feeding missions, chainsaw crews, transporting of patients, and other needs.


Tennessee Department of Health and Tennessee Department of Human Services are staffing the SEOC to monitor human needs and health issues in the state from the severe winter weather.


The Tennessee Division of Forestry has debris chainsaw crews on standby.


The Tennessee Highway Patrol has two staff at the SEOC monitoring statewide response to wrecks, noting particular traffic issues on Interstate 40 and Interstate 65.


The Tennessee Department of Military, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Tennessee State Parks have personnel and resources on standby to assist with motorist wellness checks, if they are needed.


County assistance requests coming in to the SEOC and Regional Offices have included needs for salt trucks, meals and tree removal, primarily.


PREPAREDNESS INFORMATION


AT HOME

• Be sure you have adequate clothing and blankets to keep you warm.
• Have sufficient heating fuel for your home.
• Store a good supply of dry, seasoned wood for your fireplace or wood-burning stove.
• Bring pets and companion animals inside during winter weather. Move other animals or livestock to sheltered areas with non-frozen drinking water.
• If pipes freeze, remove any insulation or layers of newspapers and wrap pipes in rags. Completely open all faucets and pour hot water over the pipes, starting where they were most exposed to the cold (or where the cold was most likely to penetrate).
• Maintain ventilation when using kerosene heaters to avoid build-up of toxic fumes. Refuel kerosene heaters outside and keep them at least three feet from flammable objects.
• Keep generators away from windows and doors, and out of garages.
• Do not bring propane gas or charcoal grills indoors, even into a garage, for cooking or heating.
• If you go outside, watch for signs of frostbite (loss of feeling and white or pale appearance in extremities) and hypothermia (uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness, and apparent exhaustion).
• Seek warm shelter and medical treatment immediately for frostbite and hypothermia symptoms.
• Don’t venture outdoors in slippery cold conditions without warm clothing, even for just a minute. A fall and prolonged exposure to cold can put your life in danger.


ON THE ROAD

• Have a winter safety kit in your car with water, food, first aid supplies, blankets, gloves, heavy boots, food, flashlight, extra batteries, and warning lights or flares.
• Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive. If your car gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along your predetermined route.
• Call *THP (*847) if you get stranded to be connected to the closest Tennessee Highway Patrol dispatch location.
• Call 511 for traffic information from the Tennessee Department of Transportation.
• Keep your gas tank at least half-full in threatening weather.
• Charge your cell phone before and while travelling.
• Dress for the weather and not the car ride, keep winter apparel and boots in your vehicle.


STAY INFORMED

• Listen to NOAA Weather Radio for winter weather watches and warnings.
• Monitor local radio and television stations for updates on weather and road conditions.
• Download the ReadyTN smartphone app to get weather, road conditions and emergency preparedness information on your smartphone.


TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

TEMA Update on Tennessee Winter Storm, 3 p.m., CST, 1/22/16


CURRENT SITUATION
Tennessee remains at a Level III – State of Emergency, declared at 3 p.m., CST, on Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016, as a major winter weather system continues its trek across Tennessee.


A Winter Storm Warning remains in effect for the entire State as heavy snow continues to fall in West and Middle Tennessee, and approaches East Tennessee.


The snow arrived earlier than expected in Middle Tennessee which has made for very treacherous driving conditions. Middle Tennessee counties, especially north of I-40 are reporting snow totals of 6” and higher. West Tennessee has seen its snowfall being to taper off with accumulations of 4” and higher. East Tennessee will see a snow rain mix this afternoon before changing to all snow tonight. Parts of East Tennessee may see blizzard-like conditions, especially in the higher elevations and closer to the Virginia border.


Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam closed State offices Friday due to the winter weather situation. A number of county governments, public and private school systems, and universities are also closed.


This is still a very dangerous winter system that has made, and will continue to make, driving on Tennessee roadways treacherous.


Travel should be avoided or limited, especially as the temperatures drop this afternoon and overnight.


FATALITIES & INJURIES
There are no confirmed reports of fatalities or injuries for this current State of Emergency. The Tennessee Department of Health has confirmed two fatalities during Wednesday’s winter weather of a 19-year-old male in Knox County, and a female of unknown age in Carter County. Both fatalities were the result of motor vehicle accidents.


POWER OUTAGES
There are reports of around 2,200 people without power in Tennessee. Davidson County has the highest currently with 1,200 outages reported, followed by Montgomery County with 700 and Shelby County with 300.


SHELTERS
On Thursday, the American Red Cross placed a number of shelters on standby along Interstates to assist with any stranded motorist needs. Currently the Red Cross is not reporting any shelter occupants. Many local governments have also opened shelters and warming centers. Information about county winter weather response or shelter operations should be directed to the specific county Emergency Management Agency.


RESPONSE ACTIVITIES
The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) in Nashville is currently operating in 24-hour rotational shifts with personnel from a number of State Agency partners.


TEMA’s Regional Offices in Jackson, Nashville and Knoxville are staffed and engaged in gathering information from counties and working with State Agencies in their regions for situational awareness and response coordination.


The Tennessee Highway Patrol and Tennessee Department of Transportation are working to clear wrecks and remove snow and slush from State highways and Interstates.


The Tennessee Department of Military and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency have personnel and resources on standby to assist with motorist wellness checks, if they are needed.


The Tennessee Division of Forestry and Tennessee State Parks also have staff at the SEOC to help with response coordination.


County assistance requests coming in to the SEOC and Regional Offices have included needs for salt trucks, meals and tree removal, primarily.


PREPAREDNESS INFORMATION


AT HOME

• Be sure you have adequate clothing and blankets to keep you warm.
• Have sufficient heating fuel for your home.
• Store a good supply of dry, seasoned wood for your fireplace or wood-burning stove.
• Bring pets and companion animals inside during winter weather. Move other animals or livestock to sheltered areas with non-frozen drinking water.
• If pipes freeze, remove any insulation or layers of newspapers and wrap pipes in rags. Completely open all faucets and pour hot water over the pipes, starting where they were most exposed to the cold (or where the cold was most likely to penetrate).
• Maintain ventilation when using kerosene heaters to avoid build-up of toxic fumes. Refuel kerosene heaters outside and keep them at least three feet from flammable objects.
• Keep generators away from windows and doors, and out of garages.
• Do not bring propane gas or charcoal grills indoors, even into a garage, for cooking or heating.
• If you go outside, watch for signs of frostbite (loss of feeling and white or pale appearance in extremities) and hypothermia (uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness, and apparent exhaustion).
• Seek warm shelter and medical treatment immediately for frostbite and hypothermia symptoms.
• Don’t venture outdoors in slippery cold conditions without warm clothing, even for just a minute. A fall and prolonged exposure to cold can put your life in danger.


ON THE ROAD

• Have a winter safety kit in your car with water, food, first aid supplies, blankets, gloves, heavy boots, food, flashlight, extra batteries, and warning lights or flares.
• Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive. If your car gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along your predetermined route.
• Call *THP (*847) if you get stranded to be connected to the closest Tennessee Highway Patrol dispatch location.
• Call 511 for traffic information from the Tennessee Department of Transportation.
• Keep your gas tank at least half-full in threatening weather.
• Charge your cell phone before and while travelling.
• Dress for the weather and not the car ride, keep winter apparel and boots in your vehicle.


STAY INFORMED

• Listen to NOAA Weather Radio for winter weather watches and warnings.
• Monitor local radio and television stations for updates on weather and road conditions.
• Download the ReadyTN smartphone app to get weather, road conditions and emergency preparedness information on your smartphone.


TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

January 21, 2016

State of Emergency in Tennessee for Severe Winter Storm Potential


CURRENT SITUATION


The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) activated the Tennessee Emergency Management Plan today, Jan. 21, 2016, and declared a Level III – State of Emergency, as of 3 p.m., CST, due to weather forecasts of a major winter weather system that will move into West Tennessee, late this evening and overnight, and gradually cross the entire State through Saturday. TEMA made the recommendation for a State of Emergency to Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam this afternoon.


The second winter weather system of the year is bringing with it threats of freezing rain, sleet, snow and high winds, which may create blizzard-like conditions in some areas.


The possible, critical impacts from this weather system may lead to stranded motorists, power outages, and people needing shelter.


The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) in Nashville will have key, TEMA staff and State Agency partners monitoring the situation, to include the Tennessee Departments of Health, Human Services, Military, and Transportation, and Tennessee Highway Patrol.


Additionally, TEMA has made contact with resources that may be needed with the potential for treacherous road conditions, including the American Red Cross, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Division of Forestry, and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.

TEMA’s regional offices in Jackson, Nashville and Knoxville are making staffing preparations for their Regional Coordination Centers (RCCs) that will include State Agency partners.


When activated the RCCs will be a point of contact to assist counties with any needs they report and to gather situational information for any response coordination. Each RCC is checking inventory of blankets, heater meals and water to fulfill any requests from counties or State Agencies for these resources.

The American Red Cross is currently putting shelter staff and volunteers on alert and is placing key shelter locations along Interstates on standby.


REGION-BY-REGION TIMING & FORECASTS


West

Timing: Early Friday morning expect snowfall in the northern part of the West Region with rain in the south. From Friday through Saturday, expect a rain and snow mix. The wintry mix should taper off beginning Saturday morning.
Temps: High 37, Low 13
Totals: 3” to 5” of snow possible with locally higher amounts possible, especially along the Ky. border


Middle

Timing: Snow falling around 6 a.m., CST, Friday in the northwest corner of Middle Tennessee, impacting Clarksville and Dover with rain along the Alabama border. Expect snow falling around 4 p.m., CST, on Friday and through the evening and overnight before tapering off Saturday.
Temps: High 41, Low 17
Totals: 1” to 3” of snow possible, possibly 3” to 6” of snow accumulation along the Ky. border


East

Timing: Freezing rain possible tonight in the northwest part of the East Tennessee region, with snowfall moving into the area Friday evening. Friday night, the East Tennessee region can expect snowfall in the north part of the area, with rain falling south in the region.
Temps: 42 High, 18 Low
Totals: Snow accumulation totals vary from 1” to 3” in the Chattanooga area with predictions of 8” to 12” in the Tri-Cities area, and possibly higher amounts in the upper elevations of the Tennessee mountains.


This is a very unpredictable weather system and the timing and precipitation amounts could change. Be prepared for changing weather and road conditions by monitoring local weather forecasts closely.


PREPAREDNESS MEASURES

AT HOME

• Be sure you have adequate clothing and blankets to keep you warm.
• Have sufficient heating fuel for your home.
• Store a good supply of dry, seasoned wood for your fireplace or wood-burning stove.
• Bring pets and companion animals inside during winter weather. Move other animals or livestock to sheltered areas with non-frozen drinking water.
• If pipes freeze, remove any insulation or layers of newspapers and wrap pipes in rags. Completely open all faucets and pour hot water over the pipes, starting where they were most exposed to the cold (or where the cold was most likely to penetrate).
• Maintain ventilation when using kerosene heaters to avoid build-up of toxic fumes. Refuel kerosene heaters outside and keep them at least three feet from flammable objects.
• If you go outside, watch for signs of frostbite (loss of feeling and white or pale appearance in extremities) and hypothermia (uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness, and apparent exhaustion).
• Seek warm shelter and medical treatment immediately for frostbite and hypothermia symptoms.


ON THE ROAD

• Have a winter safety kit in your car with water, food, first aid supplies, blankets, gloves, heavy boots, food, flashlight, extra batteries, and warning lights or flares.
• Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive. If your car gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along your predetermined route.
• Call *THP (*847) if you get stranded to be connected to the closest Tennessee Highway Patrol dispatch location.
• Call 511 for traffic information from the Tennessee Department of Transportation.
• Monitor local radio and television broadcasts, and NOAA Weather Radio, for updates on weather forecasts and conditions.


STAY INFORMED

• Listen to NOAA Weather Radio for winter weather watches and warnings.
• Monitor local radio and television stations for updates on weather and road conditions.
• Download the ReadyTN smartphone app to get weather, road conditions and emergency preparedness information on your smartphone.


TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

January 20, 2016

TEMA’s Winter Weather Update


TEMA remains at Level 4 – Elevated as we continue to receive information and updates from Local Emergency Managers and State Agency Personnel on the impacts from the first significant winter storm of the season, and as we being monitoring forecasts for the second winter weather system expected Thursday through the weekend.


1st Winter System Update
Freezing rain, sleet and snow caused mainly transportation problems in Tennessee during the first round of winter weather on Wednesday. The Tennessee Highway Patrol and Tennessee Department of Transportation are working to help motorists and clear roads with the impact of hazardous driving conditions on many Interstates and secondary highways in the State.


A number of school systems, county governments and health departments across Tennessee closed due to the snowfall, ice and cold temperatures. There are no reports of widespread power outages and significant infrastructure impacts in the State.


Motorists should still use caution if they must travel and allow extra time to reach destinations. The combination of snow and ice accumulations, and cold temperatures have made roadways slick. Any untreated roads will remain treacherous overnight as temperatures drop below freezing. A wintry mix of snow and ice is expected to continue across many parts of Tennessee.


2nd Winter System Forecast
TEMA continues to stay in close contact with National Weather Service offices in Memphis, Nashville, and Morristown, Tenn., and in Huntsville, Ala. and Jackson, Ky. as a significant winter storm is expected in the state on Thursday. Below is a region-by-region forecast.


West Tennessee
A significant winter storm is expected across the entire Mid-South Thursday night into Friday night. Heavy snow with significant accumulations are possible as snowfall rates of one-inch-per-hour is likely. The winter weather will begin impacting West Tennessee between 9 p.m., CST, Thursday and 3 a.m., CST Friday. Impacts: Roadways will be dangerous due to ice and snow; low visibility due to blow snow; power outages possible.


Middle Tennessee
The winter storm will impact Middle Tennessee Friday into Saturday morning. Snowfall amounts range from 1” to 5” in the region. A Winter Storm Watch is currently in effect until 12 p.m., CST, on Jan. 23. The heaviest snowfall is expected in northern Middle Tennessee, with up to 3” along the Kentucky border. Tennessee counties along the Alabama border may see 1” of snow. The Nashville area could see around 2” of snowfall.


East Tennessee
Icy conditions may develop across northeast Tennessee Thursday night, making travel on roads icy and slick. The National Weather Service will issue a Winter Storm Watch for Friday through Saturday for the area. Precipitation will change to all snow Friday with major, heavy snowfall possible at times, especially for the northern Plateau and eastern Tennessee mountains. Lighter snowfall expected in the lower elevations but there will be significant travel issues Friday night through Saturday.


Be Prepared for Cold Temperatures, Icy Conditions and Snow

AT HOME

• Be sure you have adequate clothing and blankets to keep you warm.
• Have sufficient heating fuel for your home.
• Store a good supply of dry, seasoned wood for your fireplace or wood-burning stove.
• Bring pets and companion animals inside during winter weather. Move other animals or livestock to sheltered areas with non-frozen drinking water.
• If pipes freeze, remove any insulation or layers of newspapers and wrap pipes in rags. Completely open all faucets and pour hot water over the pipes, starting where they were most exposed to the cold (or where the cold was most likely to penetrate).
• Maintain ventilation when using kerosene heaters to avoid build-up of toxic fumes. Refuel kerosene heaters outside and keep them at least three feet from flammable objects.
• If you go outside, watch for signs of frostbite (loss of feeling and white or pale appearance in extremities) and hypothermia (uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness, and apparent exhaustion).
• Seek warm shelter and medical treatment immediately for frostbite and hypothermia symptoms.

ON THE ROAD

• Have a winter safety kit in your car with water, food, first aid supplies, blankets, gloves, heavy boots, food, flashlight, extra batteries, and warning lights or flares.
• Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive. If your car gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along your predetermined route.
• Call *THP (*847) if you get stranded to be connected to the closest Tennessee Highway Patrol dispatch location.
• Call 511 for traffic information from the Tennessee Department of Transportation.
• Monitor local radio and television broadcasts, and NOAA Weather Radio, for updates on weather forecasts and conditions.

STAY INFORMED

• Listen to NOAA Weather Radio for winter weather watches and warnings.
• Monitor local radio and television stations for updates on weather and road conditions.
• Download the ReadyTN smartphone app to get weather, road conditions and emergency preparedness information on your smartphone.


TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

January 19, 2016

TEMA at Level 4 Elevated to Monitor Winter Weather Potential


The State Emergency Operations Center in Nashville (SEOC) set its activation at Level 4 Elevated at 4 p.m., CST, this afternoon, Jan. 19, 2016. We are monitoring weather forecasts from National Weather Service offices in Memphis, Nashville and Morristown, Tenn., as well as Jackson, Ky. and Huntsville, Ala. Given the winter weather potential, TEMA felt it necessary to elevate our status to ensure staffing, procedures and equipment in order, given the potential for two waves of snow, ice, and possibly some heavy rain, today through Friday. Below is the updated forecast and overview of the latest from the National Weather Service for Tennessee.


West Tennessee
A Winter Weather Advisory has been issued for much of northeast Arkansas, the Missouri Bootheel and northwest Tennessee beginning at 9 p.m., CST, this evening and lasting through midday Wednesday. Cold ground temperatures will allow wintry precipitation to accumulate rather quickly beginning late Tuesday night. There is the potential for freezing rain possibly mixed with ice pellets through early Wednesday morning. A second system late Thursday night through Friday may produce wintry weather for the Midsouth.


Middle Tennessee
A Winter Weather Advisory is in effect for all of Middle Tennessee from 3 a.m., CST to 6 p.m., CST, on Wednesday. A wintry mix is likely on Wednesday morning across Middle Tennessee – generally between 3 a.m., CST, and 12 p.m., CST on Wednesday. Highest snow amounts will be near Tennessee’s Kentucky border and on the Cumberland Plateau. Areas north of I-40 and east of I-24 could see between 2” to 3” of snow (up to 4” possible in some areas) while areas along and south of I-40 and west of I-24 could see freezing rain and sleet with a light glazing of ice and a dusting of snow. Ice accumulations of up to one-tenth-of-an-inch will be possible for the entire area. Temperatures will be well below freezing on Wednesday morning, so any ice or snow would quickly accumulate on bridges and roads creating hazardous driving conditions. A Winter Weather Advisory will likely be needed for at least parts of Middle Tennessee on Wednesday morning. Another winter storm could bring more snow accumulations to Middle Tennessee on Friday.


East Tennessee
A Winter Weather Advisory will be in effect Wednesday across the region. In the southern Tennessee Valley snow will switch over to a wintry mix during the day Wednesday. A wind chill advisory also is in effect for the higher elevations of the Southern Appalachians and Southwest Virginia. From 1” to 3” of snow is possible across the region. Ice accumulations across southeast Tennessee may cause tree branches to fall and may snap power lines, resulting in minor power outages. Maximum accumulations may occur between 11 a.m., EST and 3 p.m., EST, with the wintry mix ending mid-to-late afternoon. Rain changing to snow is possible late Friday afternoon also, with significant snowfall possible in the far eastern Tennessee mountains and lighter snowfall in the lower elevations.

TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

Winter is Coming to Tennessee


Winter weather is expected across Tennessee tonight and Wednesday, with a second winter weather wave possibly ushering in the weekend. Below is a region-by-region weather forecast and information on being prepared for cold weather and possible winter precipitation.


West Tennessee
A Winter Weather Advisory has been issued for much of northeast Arkansas, the Missouri Bootheel and northwest Tennessee beginning at 9 p.m., CST, this evening and lasting through midday Wednesday. Cold ground temperatures will allow wintry precipitation to accumulate rather quickly beginning late Tuesday night. There is the potential for freezing rain possibly mixed with ice pellets through early Wednesday morning. A second system late Thursday night through Friday may produce wintry weather for the Midsouth.


Middle Tennessee
A Winter Weather Advisory is in effect for all of Middle Tennessee from 3 a.m., CST to 6 p.m., CST, on Wednesday. A wintry mix is likely on Wednesday morning across Middle Tennessee – generally between 3 a.m., CST, and 12 p.m., CST on Wednesday. Areas north of I-40 and east of I-24 could see around 1″ of snow, while areas along and south of I-40 and west of I-24 could see freezing rain and sleet with a light glazing of ice and a dusting of snow. Ice accumulations of up to one-tenth-of-an-inch will be possible for the entire area. Temperatures will be well below freezing on Wednesday morning, so any ice or snow would quickly accumulate on bridges and roads creating hazardous driving conditions. A Winter Weather Advisory will likely be needed for at least parts of Middle Tennessee on Wednesday morning. Another winter storm could bring more snow accumulations to Middle Tennessee on Friday.


East Tennessee
A Winter Weather Advisory will be in effect Wednesday across the region. In the southern Tennessee Valley snow will switch over to a wintry mix during the day Wednesday. A wind chill advisory also is in effect for the higher elevations of the Southern Appalachians and Southwest Virginia.


Be prepared for this coming period of cold weather, the potential for snow and freezing rain, and hazardous driving conditions.

AT HOME

  • Be sure you have adequate clothing and blankets to keep you warm.
  • Have sufficient heating fuel for your home.
  • Store a good supply of dry, seasoned wood for your fireplace or wood-burning stove.
  • Bring pets and companion animals inside during winter weather. Move other animals or livestock to sheltered areas with non-frozen drinking water.
  • If pipes freeze, remove any insulation or layers of newspapers and wrap pipes in rags. Completely open all faucets and pour hot water over the pipes, starting where they were most exposed to the cold (or where the cold was most likely to penetrate).
  • Maintain ventilation when using kerosene heaters to avoid build-up of toxic fumes. Refuel kerosene heaters outside and keep them at least three feet from flammable objects.
  • If you go outside, watch for signs of frostbite (loss of feeling and white or pale appearance in extremities) and hypothermia (uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness, and apparent exhaustion).
  • Seek warm shelter and medical treatment immediately for frostbite and hypothermia symptoms.
  • ON THE ROAD

  • Have a winter safety kit in your car with water, food, first aid supplies, blankets, gloves, heavy boots, food, flashlight, extra batteries, and warning lights or flares.
  • Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive. If your car gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along your predetermined route.
  • Call *THP (*847) if you get stranded to be connected to the closest Tennessee Highway Patrol dispatch location.
  • Call 511 for traffic information from the Tennessee Department of Transportation.
  • Monitor local radio and television broadcasts, and NOAA Weather Radio, for updates on weather forecasts and conditions.
  • STAY INFORMED

  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio for winter weather watches and warnings.
  • Monitor local radio and television stations for updates on weather and road conditions.
  • Download the ReadyTN app to get weather, road conditions and emergency preparedness information on your smartphone.

  • TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    January 4, 2016

    TEMA 5 p.m. Flash Update for 01-04-16 on Severe Storms, Tornadoes & Flooding


    Please see the following information, noting the State of Emergency will end in Tennessee today when the State Emergency Operations Center returns to a Level IV-Elevated status as of 5 p.m., CST. Should potential impacts escalate or requests for State assistance increase, the State will return to State of Emergency.


    CURRENT SITUATION


    The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) will return to Level IV – Elevated status today, Jan. 4, 2015, as of 5 p.m., CST. This ends the State of Emergency in place since 8 p.m., CST, on Wed., Dec. 23, 2015, due to severe storms, tornadoes, and flooding.


    Before the New Year, TEMA, a number of local county Emergency Management Agencies (EMAs), the U.S. Army Corp. of Engineers (ACOE) and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) have been monitoring significant flooding issues and impacts upstream on the Mississippi River from heavy Midwest rains. Illinois and Missouri have seen significant impacts with 24 fatalities reported across both states and impacts to homes, businesses, and infrastructure.


    The latest forecasts for the Mississippi and Tennessee rivers indicate a diminishing threat for record flooding in Tennessee. Historically low-lying areas along the Mississippi River in Tennessee could see flood waters and pool rises on lakes will be unseasonably high.


    Local EMAs, ACOE, TEMA and TVA continue to monitor river and lake levels, and forecasts, and to inspect levees for potential breeches, surprise rises, and threats.


    Residents should use caution if they encounter high water – Turn Around! Don’t Drown!


    ROAD CLOSURES

    The biggest impact currently from the flooding is road closures in three West Tennessee counties, as follows:

    SR 21 in Lake County between TIPTONVILLE FERRY RD. and TIPTONVILLE-OBION LEVEE RD
    SR 79 in Lake County between HATAWAY LN. and SR 181 (GREAT RIVER ROAD)
    SR 103 in Dyer County between SR 181 (GREAT RIVER ROAD) and the WOODS RD
    SR 104 in Dyer County between the Mississippi River and SHANNON ST (Finley Community)
    SR 181 (GREAT RIVER ROAD) in Dyer County between Interstate 155 and SR 88 (This levee road is not under water at this time)
    SR 88 in Lauderdale County, West of PORTERS GAP
    SR 19 in Lauderdale County, West of CRAIG RD


    UPDATE ON SEVERE STORMS & TORNADOES

    Damage surveys from the severe storms, tornadoes and flooding from Dec. 23 to Dec. 28, 2015, are ongoing.


    The National Weather Service has confirmed five tornadoes touched down in Tennessee on Dec. 23, 2015, with two tornadoes, an EF1 and an EF3, in Wayne County; an EF2 tornado in Perry County; an EF2 tornado in DeKalb and Smith counties; and, an EF1 tornado in Madison County.


    The National Weather Service confirmed an additional tornado touchdown in Bedford County of an EF1 on Dec. 25, 2015.


    Tennessee has six, confirmed, weather-related fatalities:

    • Maury County (3) – two, 17-year-old males; one, 16-year-old female
    • Perry County (2) – one, 70-year-old male; one, 69-year-old female
    • Rhea County (1) – one, 22-year-old male


    This will be the final Flash Report on Tennessee’s severe storms and tornadoes, flooding, unless there are other significant developments.

    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.



    December 28, 2015

    TEMA 1 p.m. 12-28-15 Update on Tennessee Severe Storms, Tornadoes and Flooding


    The following is TEMA’s 1 p.m., 12-28-15 update on the current situation in Tennessee from the severe storms, tornadoes and flooding. This will be the only update today unless there are significant developments. -Dean


    CURRENT SITUATION


    The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) remains at a Level III-State of Emergency, declared at 8 p.m., CST on Wed., Dec. 23, 2015, due to severe storms, tornadoes, and periods of heavy rain impacting the State.


    A second rain front began crossing Tennessee today, 12-28-15 and is gradually lifting northward into Kentucky. TEMA was expecting this current system to compound the widespread flooding issues from the heavy rain on Dec. 25, 2015 in the state. However, local county Emergency Managers have reported only localized, minor flooding issues impacting roadways in many West Tennessee counties. See county-by-county updates below for West Tennessee.


    After this period of rain exits the State, the National Weather Service expects a return to more normal weather conditions with no expectation currently of severe weather in the coming few days.


    Currently, there are no confirmed fatalities or injuries from these recent weather systems. There are no reports of widespread power outages or shelters opening.


    The National Weather Service has confirmed an EF-1 tornado touched down in Bedford County on Dec. 25, 2015, impacting both the Calsonic and Rubbermaid manufacturing plants.


    TEMA’s Watch Point in Nashville is actively monitoring weather reports and forecasts from National Weather Service offices in Memphis, Nashville, Morristown and Huntsville, Ala.


    Counties in Middle and East Tennessee are still being assessed for damage from the severe storms, tornadoes and flooding. The rain will continue to impact the ability of local Emergency Managers to conduct damage surveys in flooded areas until flood waters can recede.


    UPDATE ON SEVERE STORMS & TORNADOES

    Damage surveys from the severe storms and tornadoes on Dec. 23, and Dec. 24, 2015, are ongoing and will be for some days as forecast for rain and severe weather impacts the ability to conduct extensive damage assessments.


    The National Weather Service has confirmed five tornadoes touched down in Tennessee on Dec. 23, 2015, with two tornadoes, an EF1 and an EF3, in Wayne County; an EF2 tornado in Perry County; an EF2 tornado in DeKalb and Smith counties; and, an EF1 tornado in Madison County.


    Tennessee has six, confirmed, weather-related fatalities:

    • Maury County (3) – two, 17-year-old males; one, 16-year-old female
    • Perry County (2) – one, 70-year-old male; one, 69-year-old female
    • Rhea County (1) – one, 22-year-old male


    WEST TENNESSEE COUNTY-BY-COUNTY UPDATE 12/28/15

    Benton – Some roads having flash flood issues
    Carroll – Many roads in county are near flooding
    Crockett – Roads closed due to flooding
    Decatur – Minor flooding along Tennessee River in the Martin’s Landing area
    Dyer – U.S. Army Corp. of Engineers pre-staging pumps to help protect property in western part of county
    Fayette – Some water on roadways but still passable
    Hardin – Minor to major flooding along Tennessee River; numerous road closures
    Henderson – Roads flooded; 400 reported without power
    Henry – Fairground’s road closed due to flooding; some trees down
    Lauderdale – Roads near Mississippi River closed
    Madison – Assisting one home with sandbags
    McNairy – Anticipating possible flash flooding issues on secondary roads
    Shelby – Shelby County Office of Preparedness monitoring Mississippi River flood stages with NWS
    Weakley – Few trees down; manageable flash flooding reported


    PRIORITIES

    Protect lives and property as needed.
    Prepare to support potential local resource requests and efforts.
    Monitor present and forecasted weather conditions.
    Support local government as needed.


    December 26, 2015

    TEMA Flash Report on Tennessee Severe Storms & Flooding, 2 p.m., CST, on 12-26-15


    Heavy rain and storms over the past 24-hours has caused widespread flooding issues for a number of Tennessee counties, primarily in the eastern part of the state. The following is a summary of the current impacts of the flooding, to include an update on the severe storms and tornadoes of Dec. 23, 2015. This will be the only TEMA update today unless there are other significant developments.


    CURRENT SITUATION


    The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) remains at a Level III-State of Emergency, declared at 8 p.m., CST on Wed., Dec. 23, 2015, due to severe storms and tornadoes.


    More severe storms and heavy rain impacted Tennessee on Dec. 25, 2015, resulting in significant flooding in many counties, with widespread impact in East Tennessee. From two to four inches of rain fell over East Tennessee yesterday with local reports of up to five inches of rain in some areas.


    The heavy rain caused damage to road and bridges primarily, with local officials also reporting impacts to homes, businesses and some public facilities. Notably, a sewer treatment plant in Morristown in Hamblen County overflowed into Turkey Creek; several swift water rescues were conducted in Marion County; a sink hole opened in Jefferson County; and, Rhea County’s Schools Central Office and some schools in Dayton reported water damage. A county-by-county update is provided below.


    Bledsoe, Hamilton, Marion, McMinn and Meigs counties remain under flood warnings.


    Currently, there are no confirmed fatalities or injuries from the widespread flooding. There are no reports of widespread power outages or shelters opening. TEMA’s East Region office continues to monitor the situation and gather situation reports from county emergency managers.


    TEMA’s Watch Point in Nashville is actively monitoring weather reports and forecasts from National Weather Service offices in Memphis, Nashville, Morristown and Huntsville, Ala. as West Tennessee is currently experiencing isolated thunderstorms and more heavy rain is expected in Tennessee over the next few days.


    The heavy rain will also impact the ability of local Emergency Managers to conduct damage surveys in flooded areas until flood waters can recede.


    UPDATE ON SEVERE STORMS & TORNADOES

    Damage surveys from the severe storms and tornadoes on Dec. 23, and Dec. 24, 2015, are ongoing and will be for some days as forecast for rain and severe weather impacts the ability to conduct extensive damage assessments.


    The National Weather Service has confirmed four tornadoes touched down in Tennessee with two tornadoes, an EF1 and an EF3, in Wayne County; an EF2 tornado in Perry County; and, an EF2 tornado in DeKalb and Smith counties.


    Tennessee has six, confirmed, weather-related fatalities:

    • Maury County (3) – two, 17-year-old males; one, 16-year-old female
    • Perry County (2) – one, 70-year-old male; one, 69-year-old female
    • Rhea County (1) – one, 22-year-old male


    COUNTY-BY-COUNTY FLOOD IMPACTS

    • Bedford – Emergency manager reported roof damage from storm at a factory
    • Bledsoe – Seven roads remain closed with damage unknown
    • Blount – Six units with minor flooding in an apartment complex, residents returned
    • Bradley – One family displaced from home due to flooding
    • Claiborne – Minor flooding in low-lying areas
    • Fentress – Reported water over one bridge
    • Hamblen – Sewage treatment plant impacted
    • Hamilton – One home flooded; some roads covered with water
    • Henderson – Minor power outages
    • Jefferson – Sinkhole reported
    • Johnson – Flooding damage to some secondary roads
    • Marion – Four majors roads covered with water; lots of debris
    • McMinn – Roads damaged
    • Meigs – Five county roads remain underwater
    • Monroe – Mannis and Carson roads closed; multiple roads damaged
    • Polk – Reported two highways flooded, Hwy. 411 and Hwy. 64, with mudslide on Hwy. 64
    • Rhea – Two homes, apartment building, schools, and a few businesses flooded
    • Rutherford – Reported several roads closed due to high water
    • Scott – Some flooding; one road underwater
    • Sequatchie – Some roads experience flooding
    • Unicoi – One tree down; 50 customers without power at one point but restored
    • Washington – Small sink hole in Johnson City repaired


    WEATHER FORECAST

    West – Marginal risk of severe storms with damaging winds and hail as primary threat. Damaging winds possible Sunday through Monday, with a Flash Flood Watch in effect Sunday through Monday.

    Middle – Minor river flooding expected today with dry conditions in the afternoon. A chance for strong to severe storms by Monday.

    East – Showers continuing with many rivers and streams at flood stage. The ground will remain saturated as the next storm systems moves in Monday and Monday night. This could lead to additional flooding.


    PRIORITIES

    Protect lives and property as needed.
    Prepare to support potential local resource requests and efforts.
    Monitor present and forecasted weather conditions.
    Support local government as needed.


    December 25, 2015

    TEMA 12 pm, CST Update – Fatality Correction


    TEMA received updated information this morning from the Tennessee Department of Health to indicate the three fatalities reported last night (12-24-14) were of three juveniles – two, 17-year-old males and one 16-year-old female. These are the only details at this time. Tennessee’s fatality total the recent storms remains at six individuals.

    December 24, 2015

    TEMA 8 p.m., CST Update on Storm Fatalities


    This is a notification from the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency to confirm three (3) additional fatalities in Tennessee from the recent severe storms.

    TEMA received information this evening from the Tennessee Department of Health indicating three (3) fatalities in Maury County of a 19-year-old female, a 22-year-old male, and another 22-year-old male.

    There are no further details at this time.

    This brings Tennessee’s storm fatality total to six (6). Previously reported fatalities include a 70-year-old male and 69-year-old female in Perry County, and a 22-year-old male in Rhea County.

    This will be the only update of the evening unless there are further significant developments.

    TEMA’s 12 p.m., CST, Update on Tennessee’s Severe Storms


    This is TEMA’s 12 p.m., CST, update on the current situation in Tennessee from the recent severe storms. Fatalities remain at three and local officials, along with TEMA personnel, are conducting damage assessments in impacted counties. This will be the last update today on the situation in Tennessee, unless there are significant developments.


    CURRENT SITUATION
    The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) remains at a Level III-State of Emergency, as of 12 p.m., CST on Thurs., Dec. 24, 2015, in response to the showers and severe storms in the state yesterday.


    There are three confirmed fatalities in Tennessee from the severe weather.
    Rhea County (1): male, 22-years-old
    Perry County (2): male, 70-years-old; female, 69-years-old


    There are no reports of widespread power outages and no shelters with occupants in the State.


    Local officials are surveying damage today in several counties reporting storm impacts. McNairy County (12 to 15 homes damaged) and Wayne County (Post Office destroyed) are a couple of the hardest hit in terms of damage. There is isolated damage in 11 other Tennessee counties, including Dyer, Hickman, Hardeman, Lawrence, Madison, Montgomery, Perry, Rhea, Sumner, Weakley and Wilson. This total may increase as officials are able to assess the storm’s impact in daylight.


    National Weather Service officials from the Memphis and Nashville offices are conducting surveys to confirm tornado touchdowns.


    TEMA is also working with the Tennessee Civil Air Patrol to schedule flyovers in counties reporting damage.


    Tennessee is going to remain at a Level III-State of Emergency for the time-being. This is due to the potential for more severe weather and heavy rain coming into the state on Dec. 25, 2015, the fact there are personnel in the field conducting damage surveys, and a forecast of more severe weather early next week.


    FORECAST
    West: Today will be sunny with temps in the low 70s with a chance of thunderstorms and showers in the evening hours. There is a 70% chance of rain accompanied with thunderstorms for Christmas Day.

    Middle: Today will be partly sunny with a high of 70. There is a 30% chance of rain and thunderstorms for the evening hours and into Christmas Day.

    East: Today showers and thunderstorms are likely with a high near 71, this will continue into Christmas Day.


    PRIORITIES
    Protect lives and property as needed.
    Prepare to support potential local resource requests and efforts.
    Monitor present and forecasted weather conditions.
    Support local government as needed.

    TEMA’s 8 a.m., CST, Update on Severe Weather Situation


    This is from 8 a.m., CST, today as TEMA’s update on the severe storm impact in Tennessee. The next update will be a 12 p.m., CST, today.


    Overnight, we have an additional confirmed fatality of a 22-year-old male in Rhea County. This brings Tennessee’s fatality total to three (3).


    CURRENT SITUATION
    The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) remains at a Level III-State of Emergency, as of 8 p.m., CST on Wed., Dec. 23, 2015, in response to the showers and severe storms in the state yesterday.


    Heavy rain remains on Tennessee’s eastern border and is expected to move out of the state today.


    There are three confirmed fatalities in Tennessee from the severe weather.
    Rhea County (1): male, 22-years-old
    Perry County (2): male, 70-years-old; female, 69-years-old


    Power outages are isolated with 298 reports in the state, primarily in Cheatham, Sevier, Shelby and Wilson counties.


    There are no shelters open in the State.


    Local officials will be surveying damage today in several counties reporting storm impacts. McNairy County (12 to 15 homes damaged) and Wayne County (Post Office destroyed) are a couple of the hardest hit in terms of damage. There is isolated damage in 11 other Tennessee counties, including Dyer, Hickman, Hardeman, Lawrence, Madison, Montgomery, Perry, Rhea, Sumner, Weakley and Wilson. This total may increase as officials are able to assess the storm’s impact in daylight.


    National Weather Service officials from the Memphis and Nashville offices will also be conducting surveys to confirm tornado touchdowns.


    TEMA is also working with the Tennessee Civil Air Patrol to schedule flyovers in counties reporting damage.


    FORECAST
    West: Today will be sunny with temps in the low 70s with a chance of thunderstorms and showers in the evening hours. There is a 70% chance of rain accompanied with thunderstorms for Christmas Day.


    Middle: Today will be partly sunny with a high of 70. There is a 30% chance of rain and thunderstorms for the evening hours and into Christmas Day.


    East: Today showers and thunderstorms are likely with a high near 71, this will continue into Christmas Day.

    COUNTY IMPACTS

    Dyer – Trees down between Dyersburg and Begota
    Hardeman – Building damaged
    Hickman – Trees down
    Lawrence – Homes damaged, trees blocking roads
    Madison – Power lines down and two homes impacted
    McNairy – 12 to 15 homes reported damaged
    Montgomery – Sub-station damaged
    Perry – Home damaged
    Rhea – Wash out on State Route 30
    Sumner – Trees down and power lines damaged
    Wayne – Post Office destroyed, homes damaged
    Weakley – Home damaged in Martin
    Wilson – Boat dock damaged


    RESPONSE ACTIONS
    The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) is staffed with personnel from the TEMA, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Health, Tennessee Department of Human Services and Tennessee Department of Transportation.


    SEOC staff is also coordinating and in communication with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Tennessee Department of Military.


    TEMA has deployed District Coordinators to Wayne and Perry counties to assist with storm response.


    The Tennessee Department of Military has placed two helicopters on standby


    The Tennessee Highway Patrol deployed its Lawrenceburg Strike Team to Wayne and Perry counties to assist locals with traffic control and other safety related duties.


    PRIORITIES
    Protect lives and property as needed.
    Prepare to support potential local resource requests and efforts.
    Monitor present and forecasted weather conditions.
    Support local government as needed.

    December 23, 2015

    TEMA 9 p.m., CST, Update on Severe Storms


    CURRENT SITUATION

    The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) is at a Level III-State of Emergency, having activated the Tennessee Emergency Management Plan in response to a year-end severe weather system impacting many counties in West and Middle Tennessee.

    Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam approved TEMA recommendation to go to a Level III – State of Emergency.

    The severe storm has caused isolated damage in a number of counties including Dyer, Hickman, Hardeman Madison, McNairy, Martin, Montgomery, Perry, Sumner, Wayne and Wilson counties.

    The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) is staffed with personnel from the TEMA, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Health and Tennessee Department of Human Services. SEOC staff is also coordinating and in communication with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Tennessee Department of Military.

    TEMA is deploying District Coordinators to some of the harder hit counties including Wayne and Perry counties to assist with storm response. Many impacted counties have reported debris across roads and some communications issues.

    The Tennessee Department of Health has confirmed two fatalities in Perry County of one male and one female of undetermined age. There are no further details at this time.

    The storm system is still impacting Middle Tennessee and is slowly moving East. TEMA will continue to monitor the situation and provide updates.

    COUNTY IMPACTS

    Dyer – Trees down between Dyersburg and Begota
    Hardeman – Building damaged
    Hickman – Trees down
    Madison – Power lines down and two homes impacted
    Martin – Home damaged
    McNairy – 12 to 15 homes reported damaged
    Montgomery – Sub-station damaged
    Perry – Home damaged
    Sumner – Trees down and power lines damaged
    Wayne – Post Office damaged, homes damaged
    Wilson – Boat dock damaged


    There are no reports of widespread power outages, but localized outages have been reported.

    PRIORITIES

    Protect lives and property as needed.
    Prepare to support potential local resource requests and efforts.
    Monitor present and forecasted weather conditions.
    Support local government as needed.


    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    December 22, 2015

    TEMA Monitoring Potential for Severe Holiday Weather


    The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) in Nashville is at a Level IV – Elevated activation as of 2 p.m., CT, today (12-22-15) due to a National Weather Service forecast for severe weather in Tennessee, starting Wednesday (12/23/15), continuing through Thursday (12/24/15) and lingering into Friday (12-25-15).

    Above-normal temperatures (15 to 25 degrees above) and excessive rain (2 to 6 inches possible) will contribute to a severe potential for damaging winds, hail and possibly isolated or even nocturnal tornadoes.

    Hail and damaging straight-line wind are also possible with this system. Localized flooding is also a possibility.

    Another round of strong storms are also possible Friday.

    Residents should monitor local broadcasts for weather updates and road conditions, and remember to Turn Around, Don’t Drown, instead of trying to drive or walk through any high water.

    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    October 14, 2015

    Tennesseans Get Ready to ShakeOut Oct. 15


    The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) is helping thousands of individuals and groups across Tennessee learn about earthquake safety in preparation for the Great Central U.S. ShakeOut, which will be held at 10:15 a.m. local time on Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015.


    During the self-led drill tomorrow, participants will practice the “Drop, Cover and Hold On” technique, where they will:

    DROP to the ground;
    • Take COVER under a sturdy desk or table, or cover your head/neck with your arms; and
    HOLD ON until the shaking stops.


    More than 400,000 Tennesseans have signed up for this year’s ShakeOut, with 195,000 registrants representing daycares and K-12 schools, 138,000 from colleges and universities, 31,000 from businesses, and 28,000 from state and local government. In 2013, Tennessee registered 332,509 ShakeOut participants.

    “Earthquakes are the top catastrophic threat to Tennessee,” said Cecil Whaley, TEMA’s earthquake coordinator. “The time is now, before the ground starts shaking, to learn how you can protect yourself, your family, your business and your community.”


    Other states participating in the ShakeOut include Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio and Oklahoma.


    Scientists estimate that there is a 25 to 40 percent probability of a damaging earthquake occurring in the central U.S. within a 50-year window of time.


    The ShakeOut is coordinated by TEMA, the Central U.S. Earthquake Consortium, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the U.S. Geological Survey and dozens of partners.


    Those interested in the ShakeOut can visit www.shakeout.org/centralus and register to participate in the drill. Many resources are available on the website for participants including earthquake drill manuals, audio and video broadcasts and earthquake scenarios.


    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    October 6, 2015

    TEMA/DOE Emergency Management Forum Oct. 14 and Oct. 15 in Oak Ridge


    The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) and Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) will be discussing Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) emergency management issues at a two-day forum, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., ET, on Wed., Oct. 14 and Thurs., Oct. 15, 2015, at the Y-12 New Hope Center on Scarboro Road in Oak Ridge.


    The forum is free to attend and topics are specifically focused on issues for emergency managers, first responders, and other officials from the Oak Ridge Reservation’s adjoining counties, the City of Oak Ridge and across Tennessee.


    Forum discussion topics will include:

    Communications Outages How Can One Call Home?
    Making Critical Decisions in an Emergency Situation
    Technology Applications for Response
    Integrating Response Resources
    Social Media Communications & Applications
    Critical Incident Stress and Post-Disaster Psychology
    Preparing for Federal Support


    The Forum was established in 2001 to promote improved communications and working relationships between ORO, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), TEMA, and first responders in the Oak Ridge and East Tennessee area.

    For more information, visit emforum.science.energy.gov

    October 4, 2015

    Tennessee Deploys Swift Water Rescue Teams to South Carolina for Catastrophic Flood Response

    Nashville, Tenn. –The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA), Tennessee’s Fire Marshal’s Office, and another 14 state and local agencies are providing swift water rescue personnel and equipment to South Carolina today as the state faces catastrophic flooding from Hurricane Joaquin.


    Tennessee is sending nine swift water rescue teams to South Carolina, with a total of 83 personnel and more than 20 boats and water craft. This is Tennessee’s largest support effort to another state in an emergency since Hurricane Katrina in 2005.


    “Tennessee has some of the best-trained, most-capable swift water rescue teams in the Southeast,” said TEMA Deputy Commissioner David Purkey. “I’m thankful we have such dedicated professionals willing to help others in their time of greatest need.”


    “We have kept Gov. Haslam and his staff updated throughout the weekend on South Carolina’s needs and they have been fully supportive,” Purkey added.


    State and local agencies deploying personnel and equipment to South Caroline include:

    • Ashland City Fire Department
    • Bradley County Fire and Rescue
    • Brentwood Fire Department
    • Dickson Fire Department
    • Franklin Fire Department
    • Knoxville Volunteer Emergency Response Squad
    • Knoxville Fire Department
    • City of Lavergne
    • Metro Nashville Fire Department
    • Montgomery County Emergency Medical Service
    • Murfreesboro Fire and Rescue Department
    • Rutherford County Fire and Rescue Department
    • Rutherford County Emergency Medical Services Special Operations Response Team
    • Williamson County Sheriff’s Office
    • Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency


    TEMA is sending four district coordinators and two communications specialist to assist the teams during missions.


    The Tennessee Fire Chief’s Mutual Aid Program is supporting the South Carolina mission with its resource tracking system.


    At 11 a.m., ET, four of Tennessee’s teams had arrived in Columbia, SC, and another five teams deployed from TEMA’s East Regional Office in Knoxville at 4 p.m., ET, to arrive this evening in Columbia.


    South Carolina continues to have deteriorating conditions and expects upwards of 10 or more inches of rain in the next 12 to 24 hours as Hurricane Joaquin moves north and northwest away from the U.S. East Coast.


    RTEMA went to a Level IV – Elevated threat level on at 2 p.m., CT, on Friday, Oct. 1, due to the potential for Hurricane Joaquin’s heavy rains reaching East Tennessee.


    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    October 1, 2015

    Activation at Level IV – Elevated to Monitor Hurricane Joaquin Impacts


    The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) in Nashville is at a Level IV – Elevated activation as of 4:30 p.m., CT, today (10-1-15) given the potential for heavy rainfall in East Tennessee from Hurricane Joaquin.

    Hurricane Joaquin is currently a Category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds of 130 m.p.h., and will impact the central and eastern Bahamas tonight and will stay in the Caribbean until Friday morning. The U.S. National Hurricane Center predicts the storm will be close to the North Carolina and Virginia coasts on Sunday.

    The SEOC is monitoring the progress of Joaquin in the Atlantic and receiving weather updates from the National Weather Service on the storms impact. Rain has already fallen off-and-on this week in East Tennessee and a few hurricane forecast models show a potential for 1 to 6 inches of more rainfall for the region as Joaquin moves up the coast.

    Heavy rainfall will bring with it the possibility of flash flooding, especially along creeks and small rivers.

    Residents should monitor local broadcasts for weather updates and road conditions, and remember to Turn Around, Don’t Drown, instead of trying to drive or walk through any high water.

    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    July 13, 2015

    TEMA Watching for Severe Weather


    The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) has changed its activation to Level IV-Elevated as of 4 p.m. today, July 13, 2015, due to the enhanced risk of severe storms in Middle and East Tennessee. The severe weather threat will continue through Wednesday as the State could see multiple rounds of storms.

    The severe weather threat includes potentially widespread damaging winds up to 75 m.p.h. or higher, large hail up to two inches in diameter or larger, and tornadoes in the EF2 or greater range.

    Possible impacts from this system could be debris from strong winds or tornadoes, widespread power outages, and damage to structures.

    Please monitor local broadcasts for current weather information and forecasts. TEMA provide updates to the State’s severe weather developments, impacts and threats as we receive them over the next few days.

    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    April 24, 2015

    Severe Weather Possible this Weekend


    The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) in Nashville will step up to Level IV-Elevated, as of 3:00 p.m., CDT, on Friday, April 24, 2015 given the potential for severe weather this weekend in Middle and East Tennessee.

    The National Weather Service (NWS) in Nashville predicts strong to severe thunderstorms late Friday night through Saturday afternoon in Middle Tennessee. NWS has confidence there will be at least some thunderstorms in the Metro Nashville area by daybreak Saturday. Showers and storms could last until 10 a.m. Saturday with the returning possibility of more storms later Saturday afternoon. These afternoon storms especially are bringing with them the possibility of damaging winds, large hail, heavy rainfall and even tornadoes.

    In East Tennessee, the NWS expects significant severe thunderstorms Saturday afternoon and evening across the Tennessee Valley and Southern Appalachian region. Dangerous winds in excess of 70 m.p.h. and golfball to baseball size hail will be the primary impacts, with the possibility of isolated tornadoes and localized flooding.

    Be sure you have situational awareness this weekend, especially if you are outdoors, so you know where you will take cover should local officials or the NWS issue weather warnings. Also, listen to radio and television broadcasts, or NOAA weather radio, for the latest on severe weather conditions and forecasts.

    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    April 13, 2015

    SBA Disaster Assistance Available to Private NonProfit Organizations in Tennessee


    The U.S. Small Business Administration announced today certain Private NonProfit organizations (PNPs) that do not provide critical services of a governmental nature may be eligible to apply for low interest rate disaster loans. These loans are available following the Presidential disaster declaration for Public Assistance resulting from damages caused by a severe winter storm and flooding on Feb. 15 to 22, 2015.

    PNPs located in the following Tennessee counties are eligible to apply to SBA: Anderson, Bedford, Bledsoe, Blount, Campbell, Clay, Coffee, Cumberland, Fentress, Giles, Grainger, Grundy, Hamblen, Hancock, Hardeman, Jefferson, Knox, Lawrence, Loudon, Marshall, McMinn, McNairy, Meigs, Monroe, Moore, Morgan, Obion, Overton, Putnam, Roane, Scott, Sevier, Van Buren, Warren and White. Examples of eligible non-critical PNP organizations include, but are not limited to, food kitchens, homeless shelters, museums, libraries, community centers, schools and colleges.

    PNP organizations may borrow up to $2 million to repair or replace damaged or destroyed real estate, machinery and equipment, inventory and other business assets. The interest rate is 2.625 percent with terms up to 30 years. Applicants may be eligible for a loan amount increase up to 20 percent of their physical damages, as verified by the SBA, to make improvements that help prevent the risk of future property damage caused by a similar disaster.

    The SBA also offers Economic Injury Disaster Loans to help PNP organizations meet working capital needs, such as ongoing operating expenses. Economic Injury Disaster Loan assistance is available regardless of whether the organization suffered any physical property damage.

    Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application via SBA’s secure website at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela.

    Disaster loan information and application forms may also be obtained by calling the SBA’s Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955 (800-877-8339 for the deaf and hard-of-hearing) or by sending an e-mail to disastercustomerservice@sba.gov. Loan applications can be downloaded from the SBA’s website at www.sba.gov/disaster. Completed applications should be mailed to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155.

    The filing deadline to return applications for physical property damage is June 1, 2015. The deadline to return economic injury applications is January 4, 2016.

    March 17, 2015

    Tennessee Among Four States for National EAS Test Wednesday


    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in coordination with state and tribal emergency managers and state broadcasting associations, will conduct a test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) on Wednesday, March 18, 2015 in Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, and Tennessee. The test will begin at 2:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) and will last approximately one minute.


    “The goal of the test is to assess the operational readiness and effectiveness of the EAS to deliver a national emergency test message to radio, television and cable providers who broadcast lifesaving alerts and emergency information to the public,” said Damon Penn, Assistant Administrator of FEMA’s National Continuity Programs. “The only way to demonstrate the resilience of the system’s infrastructure is through comprehensive testing to ensure that members of tribes, and the residents of Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, and Tennessee, receive alerts when an emergency occurs.”


    The test will be seen and heard over radio and television in Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, and Tennessee, similar to regular monthly testing of the EAS conducted by state officials and broadcasters. The test message will be nearly identical to the regular monthly tests of the EAS normally heard by public. Only the word “national” will be added to the test message:


    “This is a national test of the Emergency Alert System. This is only a test…”
    The test is designed to have limited impact on the public, with only minor disruptions of radio and television programs that normally occur when broadcasters regularly test EAS in their area. Broadcasters and cable operators’ participation in the test is completely voluntary. There is no Federal Communications Commission regulatory liability for stations that choose not to participate.


    In 2007, FEMA began modernizing the nation’s public alert and warning system by integrating new technologies into existing alert systems. The new system is known to broadcasters and local alerting officials as the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System or IPAWS. IPAWS connects public safety officials, such as emergency managers, police and fire departments, to multiple communications channels to send alerts to warn when a disaster happens. For more information, please visit www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/31814.

    March 6, 2015

    State of Emergency Ends in Tennessee at 4 p.m, CST, on 3/6/15


    This is TEMA’s update to indicate the State Emergency Operations Center has stepped down to a Level IV-Elevated activation. This ends the State of Emergency in Tennessee, effective at 4 p.m., CST, on Friday, March 6, 2015. The information below includes a region-by-region update as well as a timeline of the progression of our activation levels since Feb. 16. This will be the last update on TEMA’s winter weather response. More updates will be provided as we move into the recovery phase from this emergency. –Dean


    CURRENT SITUATION
    The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) has downgraded its activation to a Level IV – Elevated status ending the State of Emergency in Tennessee.


    There are no unmet needs reported in Tennessee from the recent winter storm and cold weather, and the SEOC has no outstanding requests for assistance from counties.


    REGION-BY-REGION
    West Region – No major issues, just a few wrecks. No reports of widespread power outages. No unmet needs. Regional Coordination Center will close at 4:30 p.m., CST.


    Middle Region – Interstates clear but back roads still icy in areas. No reports of widespread power outages. No unmet needs. Regional Coordination Center closed 3/5/15.


    East Region – Flooding threat has subsided in Claiborne County. Some roads closed in a few counites. No shelters open. No reports of widespread power outages. Regional Coordination Center will close at 5:30 p.m., EST.


    SEOC ACTIVATION TIMELINE

    Level III – State of Emergency at 9 p.m., CST, on Feb. 16, 2015
    Level II – State of Emergency at 3 p.m., CST, on Feb. 21, 2015
    Level III – State of Emergency at 2 p.m., CST, on March 3, 2015
    Level IV – Elevated at 4 p.m., CST, on March 6, 2015


    TEMA’s mission, www.tnema.org, is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    TEMA’s 11 a.m., CST, Update on Tennessee’s State of Emergency 3/6/15


    This is TEMA’s 11 a.m., CST, update on Tennessee’s State of Emergency. We have an additional confirmed fatality from Hamilton County this morning, bringing our total fatalities from this weather system to four. We are watching some flooding issues in Gibson and Claiborne counties. Otherwise, we do not have any reports of unmet needs in the state.


    CURRENT SITUATION
    The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) remains at a Level III – State of Emergency and the Tennessee Emergency Management Plan remains activated due to the previous severe winter storm.


    Very cold temperatures are in place today across Tennessee, the last remnant of a winter weather system that brought freezing rain, sleet heavy snowfall and heavy rain to the state beginning on Mar. 4.


    The SEOC has confirmed another fatality this morning of a confirmed of a 55-year-old-male from a motor vehicle accident this morning in Hamilton County.


    Interstates in Tennessee are in good shape and moving. Patches of ice and sleet remain on Interstates and secondary roads, so motorists are still advised to use caution when travelling. TDOT is also keeping a message board in place on I-24 west bound warning motorists about the hazardous driving conditions in Kentucky.


    The National Guard has five units still on standby in Obion, Cookeville, Dickson and Jackson to assist motorists and address other life safety needs.


    The SEOC is also monitoring flooding potential from levee issues in Gibson County, and in Claiborne County on the Powell and Clinch rivers.


    All shelters in Tennessee are closed. There are no widespread power outages. The SEOC is not receiving any reports of unmet needs in Tennessee.


    FATALITIES
    There are four (4) confirmed weather-related fatalities form this winter weather system:

    • Campbell County: One (1) fatality: 61-year-old, male, motor vehicle accident on 3/5/15
    • Dickson County: One (1) fatality: 46-year-old, male, motor vehicle accident on 3/5/15
    • Hamilton County : One (1) fatality: 64-year-old, male, motor vehicle accident on 3/6/15
    • Wilson County: One (1) fatality: 35-year-old, female, motor vehicle accident on 3/4/15


    PRIORITIES

    • Address life safety needs
    • Support local governments and resource requests
    • Continue to assess and address roadway conditions
    • Assist stranded motorists and conduct sheltering operations when needed
    • Monitor changes to weather conditions
    • Prepare for transition from response to recovery mode


    State Agencies working at the SEOC, in the field or other locations on the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservation, Correction, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commission on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    March 5, 2015

    TEMA’s 3 p.m., CST, Update on 3/5/15 on Tennessee State of Emergency


    This is TEMA’s 3 p.m, CST, update on Tennessee’s State of Emergency. We have increased to three confirmed fatalities in the state from this current weather system. These fatalities have all been motor-vehicle related. We are also working with TDOT and THP closely to monitor, and be ready for, any spillover impact from the I-24 and I-65 issues in Ky.


    CURRENT SITUATION
    The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) remains at a Level III – State of Emergency and the Tennessee Emergency Management Plan remains activated due to the previous severe winter storm.


    The winter precipitation is moving out of Tennessee. Interstates are in good shape with traffic moving, though slowly in spots, due to ice and snow.


    While Interstate traffic in Tennessee is flowing, heavy snowfall has caused traffic issues on both I-24 and I-65 in Kentucky. TDOT has placed a message board at Exit 8 on I-24 west bound in Tennessee warning motorist I-24 is closed a mile-marker 86 in Kentucky. TDOT is also announcing that driving conditions on I-24 and I-65 both in Kentucky are treacherous and motorists should be take notice.


    The Tennessee National Guard is moving four units to Nashville to place on standby for wellness checks in case I-65 issues in Kentucky begin impacting Tennessee. Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Tennessee Parks are also on standby to assist with any motorist wellness checks. Tennessee Highway Patrol is also flying reconnaissance missions over I-24 and I-65 to monitor traffic.


    The temperatures are expected to stay below freezing through midday Friday. This will keep many roadways slick and hazardous for an extended period of time in West and Middle Tennessee.


    FATALITIES
    There are three (3) confirmed weather-related fatalities form this winter weather system:

    • Campbell County: One (1) fatality, 61-year-old, male, motor vehicle accident on 3/5/15
    • Dickson County: One (1) fatality, 46-year-old, male, motor vehicle accident on 3/5/15
    • Wilson County: One (1) fatality, 35-year-old, female, motor vehicle accident on 3/4/15


    POWER OUTAGES
    There are no reports of widespread power outages, but localized outages are possible.


    SHELTERS
    There are two Red Cross shelters on standby:

    • Campbell Co – First Baptist Church
    • Campbell Co – Lafollette Rec Center


    COUNTY-BY-COUNTY UPDATES

    The heaviest snow impact is in the northwest corner of Tennessee and in counties north of I-25 in the state. Some counties are also reporting flood impacts.


    Campbell County – State Route 297 in Campbell County is closed due to flooding.


    Claiborne County – Local EMA reports Powell River at highest flow in five years at Jonesville, VA.


    Gibson County – Local EMA monitoring three breaks in levees that could impact water treatment plant, the jail and three homes.


    Hancock County – Flooding is reported on State Route 33 in Hancock County.


    Montgomery County – Reporting six inches of snow in Clarksville, higher amounts near the Kentucky state line.


    Obion County – Heavy snow has impacted travel in the county, especially for emergency medical services. One National Guard unit is assisting Baptist Hospital in Obion County to follow on ambulance runs to assist transporting ambulance crew if access issues.


    Robertson County – Reports of 8 to 10 inches of snow with reports of wreckers clearing 18-wheelers stuck on hills.


    Stewart County – Reports 12 inches of snow in the northwestern part of the county. The Stewart County Sheriff is using Humvees and heavy trucks to escort.


    PRIORITIES

    • Address life safety needs
    • Support local governments
    • Fulfill resource requests
    • Monitor changing weather conditions
    • Assess roadways and assist any stranded motorists


    State Agencies working at the SEOC, in the field or other locations on the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservation, Correction, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    March 4, 2015

    TEMA’s 1 p.m., CST, Update on Tennessee’s State of Emergency


    This update concerns the current winter storm potential for Tennessee, starting today Mar. 4, 2015. Please see the previous website posts for detailed updates and information from the ice storm that impacted the state beginning on Feb. 16, 2015.


    CURRENT SITUATION


    The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) remains at a Level III – State of Emergency and the Tennessee Emergency Management Plan remains activated due to the previous severe winter storm.


    A major, late winter storm will spread across much of West and Middle Tennessee this afternoon and tonight bringing sub-freezing temperatures and causing rain to change to freezing rain, sleet and snow before ending Thursday.


    A Winter Storm Warning is in now in effect for West Tennessee until 9 a.m. Thursday. A Winter Storm Warning is in place for Middle Tennessee until Thursday morning, along and north of I-40. A Winter Weather Advisory also is in place south of I-40 but could change to a Winter Weather Warning later today. A Winter Weather Advisory is in place for parts of East Tennessee. A Winter Storm Warning will be in place from 1 a.m. to 4 a.m. Thursday for the Cumberland Plateau area to around Middlesboro.


    Snowfall in the warning areas could be between 2 and 6 inches with about a tenth of an inch of ice accumulation.


    Main Threats: Power Outages – Hazardous Roadway Conditions


    RESPONSE ACTIONS

    • The National Guard has four units on standby in Cookeville, Dickson, Jackson and Murfreesboro to assist with wellness checks and other life-safety needs should they arise.

    • TDOT is loading trucks with salt to begin spreading as soon as it starts snowing.

    • TEMA’s East, Middle and West regional offices are staffed and polling counties for situational awareness and information on conditions.

    • SEOC holding weather update calls with National Weather Service offices in Tennessee.

    • There are no shelters currently open in Tennessee and no reports of power outages from the current weather system.


    PRIORITIES
    • Address life safety needs
    • Support local governments
    • Fulfill resource requests
    • Monitor changing weather conditions
    • Assess roadways and assist any stranded motorists


    KEY MESSAGES

    • Monitor local radio and television broadcasts, and NOAA Weather Radio, for updates on weather conditions.
    • Call 511, or visit www.tn511.com, before traveling into areas affected by severe winter weather for updates from TDOT on hazardous roadway conditions.
    • Call *THP (*847) from any mobile phone if your vehicle gets stranded to be connected to the closest Tennessee Highway Patrol dispatcher who can send help.
    • Call 911 in the event of an emergency.
    • If your vehicle becomes stranded or you are involved in an accident, stay in your vehicle until help arrives.
    • Travel with emergency supplies, including blankets, water, a windshield scraper, a flash light with fresh batteries, jumper cables and a first aid kit.
    • Ensure your vehicle has plenty of fuel and that tires are properly inflated.
    • Use extreme caution and take the roadways that have been treated with salt or brine.


    Download the ReadyTN smartphone app for weather, road and preparedness information.


    State Agencies working at the SEOC, in the field or other locations on the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservation, Correction, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    March 2, 2015

    TEMA 2 p.m., CST, Update on Tennessee State of Emergency 3/2/15

    This is TEMA’s 2 p.m., CST, update on Tennessee State of Emergency, indicating we have dropped to a Level III activation. This will be the final update today. We will monitor the incoming storm system and issue more updates as the weather situation progresses on Tuesday. –Dean


    CURRENT SITUATION
    The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) stepped down to a Level III – State of Emergency at 2:00 p.m., CST, on March 2, 2015. The Tennessee Emergency Management Plant remains activated and Tennessee remains in a State of Emergency.


    We are seeing a number of improvements in conditions from last week’s ice storm and severe winter weather as fewer customers are without power and fewer occupants are seeking shelter resources. Many counties impacted last week are also beginning to consider priorities for recovery and starting preliminary damage assessments, primarily in West Tennessee.


    TEMA will maintain a presence in Cumberland and Fentress counties to help local EMA’s and officials with ongoing issues in those counties in ongoing power outages and continuing shelter missions.


    Additionally, Tennessee could experience severe storms and heavy rain beginning on Tuesday, with another chance for winter precipitation, including the potential for sleet, snow and freezing rain, on Wednesday and very cold temperatures Thursday and Friday. The National Guard is standing by four units to assist with wellness checks for Wednesday for the Middle Tennessee area.


    The Level III – State of Emergency will keep the SEOC in a circling pattern and ready to scale up should a mid-week winter weather system create hazardous conditions for Tennessee.


    Tennessee went to a Level II-State of Emergency, at 3 p.m., CST on Feb. 21, 2015. Originally, TEMA elevated to a Level III – State of Emergency for this winter storm at 9 p.m., CST, on Feb. 16, 2015.


    SEOC PRIORITIES

    • Address life safety needs
    • Support local governments and resource requests
    • Monitor changes to weather conditions
    • Assist with debris removal and management
    • Prepare for transition from response to recovery mode


    FATALITIES
    Tennessee has 30, confirmed, weather-related fatalities., Please note: This is the only information TEMA has regarding fatalities: county, gender, age and cause. If you need more information, please contact the local Emergency Medical Service, Medical Examiner, Emergency Management Agency or law enforcement of the county in which the fatality occurred.

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Bledsoe County – One (1) fatality: 55-year-old-male, hypothermia

    • Campbell County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 76-year-old male, weather related
    - 32-year-old-male, weather related

    • Claiborne County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 63-year-old male, weather related
    - 53-year-old male, weather related

    • Cumberland County – One (1) fatality: 83-year-old male, carbon monoxide poisoning

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Haywood County – One (1) fatality: 40-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 64-year-old female, hypothermia related
    - 69-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Hickman County One (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment

    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities:

    - 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    - 75-year-old male, fire
    - 68-year-old female, fire
    - 47-year-old male, fire

    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia

    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Polk County – One (1) fatality: 79-year-old male, weather related

    • Roane County – One (1) fatality: 44-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality: 85-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sevier – One (1) fatalities: 70-year-old female, weather related;

    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities:

    - 48-year-old male, hypothermia related
    - Male (age unknown), hypothermia related
    - (Demographics unknown), hypothermia related

    • Sumner County – One (1) fatality: Male, 60s, weather related

    • Wayne County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, weather related

    • Weakley County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, fall, hypothermia related

    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 34-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    - 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservation, Correction, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission, www.tnema.org, is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    TEMA’s Update on Tennessee State of Emergency, 10:30 a.m., CST, on 3/2/15


    This is TEMA’s 10:30 a.m., CST, update on the Tennessee State of Emergency. There was significant activity over the weekend in Cumberland County with TEMA transporting and setting up a radio tower to reinforce the county’s emergency communications. We are also watching for another winter weather system coming in mid-week.


    CURRENT SITUATION
    Tennessee remains at a Level II-State of Emergency, since 3 p.m., CST on Feb. 21, 2015. The original elevation to a Level III – State of Emergency for this winter storm was at 9 p.m. on Feb. 16, 2015.


    Over the weekend, TEMA worked with the Cumberland County EMA to install a mobile radio tower in the county to improve emergency communications among responders.


    Multiple chainsaw crews are scheduled to work throughout the Cumberland Plateau. TDOT, Volunteer Organizations Active in Disasters (VOAD), TN Division of Forestry and National Guard units have supplied chainsaw crews to work side-by-side with local responders.


    The SEOC is monitoring the forecast mid-week for another round of winter weather across Tennessee.


    Priorities for the SEOC include: address life safety needs; support local governments and resource requests; continue to assess and address roadway conditions; assist stranded motorists and conduct sheltering operations when needed; monitor changes to weather conditions; assist with debris removal and management; and prepare for transition from response to recovery mode.


    POWER OUTAGES
    There are 2,379 customers without power in Tennessee, down from just under 8,000 Friday. The highest outages remain in Cumberland County (1,494), followed by White County (536)..


    SHELTERS
    There are two shelters open with 26 occupants:

    • Crossville First United Methodist Church (23 occupants)
    • Monterey Junction Professional Building (3 occupants)


    FATALITIES
    Tennessee has 30, confirmed, weather-related fatalities., Please note: This is the only information TEMA has regarding fatalities: county, gender, age and cause. If you need more information, please contact the local Emergency Medical Service, Medical Examiner, Emergency Management Agency or law enforcement of the county in which the fatality occurred.

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Bledsoe County – One (1) fatality: 55-year-old-male, hypothermia

    • Campbell County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 76-year-old male, weather related
    - 32-year-old-male, weather related

    • Claiborne County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 63-year-old male, weather related
    - 53-year-old male, weather related

    • Cumberland County – One (1) fatality: 83-year-old male, carbon monoxide poisoning

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Haywood County – One (1) fatality: 40-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 64-year-old female, hypothermia related
    - 69-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Hickman County One (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment

    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities:

    - 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    - 75-year-old male, fire
    - 68-year-old female, fire
    - 47-year-old male, fire

    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia

    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Polk County – One (1) fatality: 79-year-old male, weather related

    • Roane County – One (1) fatality: 44-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality: 85-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sevier – One (1) fatalities: 70-year-old female, weather related;

    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities:

    - 48-year-old male, hypothermia related
    - Male (age unknown), hypothermia related
    - (Demographics unknown), hypothermia related

    • Sumner County – One (1) fatality: Male, 60s, weather related

    • Wayne County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, weather related

    • Weakley County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, fall, hypothermia related

    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 34-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    - 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservation, Correction, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission, www.tnema.org, is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    February 27, 2015

    TEMA 2/27/15 Update on Fatalities


    UPDATE ON FATALITIES


    We moved higher in total fatalities this afternoon, back to 30, as we received confirmation of a weather-related death overnight in Bledsoe County of a 55-year-old male from hypothermia.

    FATALITIES
    Tennessee has 30, confirmed, weather-related fatalities., Please note: This is the only information TEMA has regarding fatalities: county, gender, age and cause. If you need more information, please contact the local Emergency Medical Service, Medical Examiner, Emergency Management Agency or law enforcement of the county in which the fatality occurred.

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Bledsoe County – One (1) fatality: 55-year-old-male, hypothermia

    • Campbell County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 76-year-old male, weather related
    - 32-year-old-male, weather related

    • Claiborne County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 63-year-old male, weather related
    - 53-year-old male, weather related

    • Cumberland County – One (1) fatality: 83-year-old male, carbon monoxide poisoning

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Haywood County – One (1) fatality: 40-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 64-year-old female, hypothermia related
    - 69-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Hickman County One (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment

    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities:

    - 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    - 75-year-old male, fire
    - 68-year-old female, fire
    - 47-year-old male, fire

    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia

    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Polk County – One (1) fatality: 79-year-old male, weather related

    • Roane County – One (1) fatality: 44-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality: 85-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sevier – One (1) fatalities: 70-year-old female, weather related;

    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities:

    - 48-year-old male, hypothermia related
    - Male (age unknown), hypothermia related
    - (Demographics unknown), hypothermia related

    • Sumner County – One (1) fatality: Male, 60s, weather related

    • Wayne County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, weather related

    • Weakley County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, fall, hypothermia related

    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 34-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    - 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservation, Correction, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission, www.tnema.org, is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    TEMA’s 9 a.m., CST, Update on Tennessee’s State of Emergency


    This information is current as of 9 a.m., CST, on Tennessee’s State of Emergency.


    CURRENT SITUATION
    Tennessee remains at a Level II-State of Emergency, since 3 p.m., CST on Feb. 21, 2015. The original elevation to a Level III – State of Emergency for this winter storm was at 9 p.m. on Feb. 16, 2015.


    It will be cold and windy in Tennessee today with a warming trend expected through the weekend.


    Multiple chainsaw crews are scheduled to work throughout the Cumberland Plateau. TDOT, Volunteer Organizations Active in Disasters (VOAD), TN Division of Forestry and National Guard units have supplied chainsaw crews to work side-by-side with local responders.


    Priorities for the SEOC include: address life safety needs; support local governments and resource requests; continue to assess and address roadway conditions; assist stranded motorists and conduct sheltering operations when needed; monitor changes to weather conditions; assist with debris removal and management; and prepare for transition from response to recovery mode.


    POWER OUTAGES
    There are 7,489 customers without power in Tennessee, down from 19,700 yesterday, with the highest outage in Cumberland County at 5,146. Other outages include: White (733); Putnam (608); Overton (549); and Fentress (429).


    SHELTERS
    There are five shelters open with 129 occupants:
    • Cumberland Fellowship in Crossville (93 occupants)
    • First Baptist Church of Jamestown (4 occupants)
    • Monterey Junction Professional Building (3 occupants)
    • National Guard Amory in Sparta (13 occupants)
    • Wilson Elementary School in Crawford (16 occupants)


    FATALITIES
    Tennessee has 29, confirmed, weather-related fatalities., Please note: This is the only information TEMA has regarding fatalities: county, gender, age and cause. If you need more information, please contact the local Emergency Medical Service, Medical Examiner, Emergency Management Agency or law enforcement of the county in which the fatality occurred.

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Campbell County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 76-year-old male, weather related
    - 32-year-old-male, weather related

    • Claiborne County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 63-year-old male, weather related
    - 53-year-old male, weather related

    • Cumberland County – One (1) fatality: 83-year-old male, carbon monoxide poisoning

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Haywood County – One (1) fatality: 40-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 64-year-old female, hypothermia related
    - 69-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Hickman County One (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment

    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities:

    - 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    - 75-year-old male, fire
    - 68-year-old female, fire
    - 47-year-old male, fire

    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia

    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Polk County – One (1) fatality: 79-year-old male, weather related

    • Roane County – One (1) fatality: 44-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality: 85-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sevier – One (1) fatalities: 70-year-old female, weather related;

    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities:

    - 48-year-old male, hypothermia related
    - Male (age unknown), hypothermia related
    - (Demographics unknown), hypothermia related

    • Sumner County – One (1) fatality: Male, 60s, weather related

    • Wayne County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, weather related

    • Weakley County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, fall, hypothermia related

    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 34-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    - 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservation, Correction, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission, www.tnema.org, is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    February 26, 2015

    TEMA Update on Fatalities


    UPDATE ON FATALITIES
    We are revising the weather-related fatality total in Tennessee downward to 29 confirmed. A press release from the Sevier County Sheriff’s Office indicates only one of the fatalities in Sevier County was the result of hypothermia, while the other was due to an aneurism. If you have questions regarding the information, please contact the Sevier County Sheriff’s Office.


    Tennessee remains at a Level II-State of Emergency, since 3 p.m., CST on Feb. 21, 2015. The original elevation to a Level III – State of Emergency for this winter storm was at 9 p.m. on Feb. 16, 2015.


    FATALITIES
    Tennessee has 29, confirmed, weather-related fatalities., Please note: This is the only information TEMA has regarding fatalities: county, gender, age and cause. If you need more information, please contact the local Emergency Medical Service, Medical Examiner, Emergency Management Agency or law enforcement of the county in which the fatality occurred.

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Campbell County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 76-year-old male, weather related
    - 32-year-old-male, weather related

    • Claiborne County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 63-year-old male, weather related
    - 53-year-old male, weather related

    • Cumberland County – One (1) fatality: 83-year-old male, carbon monoxide poisoning

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Haywood County – One (1) fatality: 40-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 64-year-old female, hypothermia related
    - 69-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Hickman County One (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment

    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities:

    - 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    - 75-year-old male, fire
    - 68-year-old female, fire
    - 47-year-old male, fire

    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia

    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Polk County – One (1) fatality: 79-year-old male, weather related

    • Roane County – One (1) fatality: 44-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality: 85-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sevier – One (1) fatalities: 70-year-old female, weather related;

    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities:

    - 48-year-old male, hypothermia related
    - Male (age unknown), hypothermia related
    - (Demographics unknown), hypothermia related

    • Sumner County – One (1) fatality: Male, 60s, weather related

    • Wayne County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, weather related

    • Weakley County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, fall, hypothermia related

    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 34-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    - 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservation, Correction, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission, www.tnema.org, is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    TEMA 9 a.m., CST, Update on Tennessee State of Emergency


    The following is current as of 9 a.m., CST, on Tennessee’s State of Emergency.


    CURRENT SITUATION
    Tennessee remains at a Level II-State of Emergency, since 3 p.m., CST on Feb. 21, 2015. The original elevation to a Level III – State of Emergency for this winter storm was at 9 p.m. on Feb. 16, 2015.


    The SEOC is monitoring another wave of winter precipitation moving into Tennessee with initial periods of sleet before conditions become favorable for snow accumulations.


    A Winter Storm Warning is in place for portions of southwest Tennessee near the Tennessee River, with a Winter Weather Advisory in effect for the remainder of West Tennessee. The Winter Storm Warning will be in effect until midnight with the possibility of 2 to 4 inches of snow accumulation.


    Snow is expected across Middle Tennessee this afternoon and tonight with a Winter Storm Warning to be in effect at noon today through 6 a.m. Thursday, with 2 to 4 inches of snow accumulation predicted.


    East Tennessee can expect the winter weather system to move across the area this evening through Thursday morning, and produce heavy snow fall, accumulations of 4 to 7 inches are expected. A Winter Storm Warning will be in effect from Wednesday at 1 p.m. through Thursday at 7 a.m.


    Icing conditions cannot be ruled out, especially along Tennessee’s southern counties on the Alabama and Georgia borders.


    Hazardous driving conditions are expected along with cold temperatures. This combination can affect travelers on roadways. The heavy, wet snow and ice may down trees and power lines with localized power outages possible.


    Please monitor local TV and radio broadcasts for updates on this developing winter weather situation


    POWER OUTAGES
    There are 19,700 customers without power in Tennessee over five counties. This is down from around 36,000 without power last night. This total includes: Cumberland (14,000); Fentress (2,500); Overton (700); Putnam (1,300) and White (1,200).


    SHELTERS
    The American Red Cross has six shelters open in five counties with 224 occupants:

    • Overton – Crawford, Wilson Elementary, 10 occupants
    • Putnam – Cookeville, First United Methodist Church, 36 occupants
    • Putnam – Monterey, First Baptist Church, 75 occupants
    • Cumberland – Crossville, Cumberland Fellowship Baptist Church, 146 occupants
    • White – Sparta, National Guard Armory, 36 occupants
    • Fentress – Jamestown, First Baptist Church, 8 occupants


    FATALITIES
    Tennessee has 30, confirmed, weather-related fatalities., Please note: This is the only information TEMA has regarding fatalities: county, gender, age and cause. If you need more information, please contact the local Emergency Medical Service, Medical Examiner, Emergency Management Agency or law enforcement of the county in which the fatality occurred.

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Campbell County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 76-year-old male, weather related
    - 32-year-old-male, weather related

    • Claiborne County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 63-year-old male, weather related
    - 53-year-old male, weather related

    • Cumberland County – One (1) fatality: 83-year-old male, carbon monoxide poisoning

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Haywood County – One (1) fatality: 40-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 64-year-old female, hypothermia related
    - 69-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Hickman County One (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment

    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities:

    - 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    - 75-year-old male, fire
    - 68-year-old female, fire
    - 47-year-old male, fire

    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia

    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Polk County – One (1) fatality: 79-year-old male, weather related

    • Roane County – One (1) fatality: 44-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality: 85-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sevier – Two (2) fatalities,

    - 70-year-old female, weather related;
    - Male (age unknown), weather related

    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities:

    - 48-year-old male, hypothermia related
    - Male (age unknown), hypothermia related
    - (Demographics unknown), hypothermia related

    • Sumner County – One (1) fatality: Male, 60s, weather related

    • Wayne County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, weather related

    • Weakley County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, fall, hypothermia related

    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 34-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    - 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservation, Correction, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission, www.tnema.org, is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    February 25, 2015

    TEMA 9 a.m., CST, Update on State of Emergency


    The following information is current as of 9 a.m., CST, on Tennessee’s response to the State of Emergency.


    CURRENT SITUATION
    Tennessee remains at a Level II-State of Emergency, since 3 p.m., CST on Feb. 21, 2015. The original elevation to a Level III – State of Emergency for this winter storm was at 9 p.m. on Feb. 16, 2015.


    The SEOC is monitoring another wave of winter precipitation moving into Tennessee with initial periods of sleet before conditions become favorable for snow accumulations.


    A Winter Storm Warning is in place for portions of southwest Tennessee near the Tennessee River, with a Winter Weather Advisory in effect for the remainder of West Tennessee. The Winter Storm Warning will be in effect until midnight with the possibility of 2 to 4 inches of snow accumulation.


    Snow is expected across Middle Tennessee this afternoon and tonight with a Winter Storm Warning to be in effect at noon today through 6 a.m. Thursday, with 2 to 4 inches of snow accumulation predicted.


    East Tennessee can expect the winter weather system to move across the area this evening through Thursday morning, and produce heavy snow fall, accumulations of 4 to 7 inches are expected. A Winter Storm Warning will be in effect from Wednesday at 1 p.m. through Thursday at 7 a.m.


    Icing conditions cannot be ruled out, especially along Tennessee’s southern counties on the Alabama and Georgia borders.


    Hazardous driving conditions are expected along with cold temperatures. This combination can affect travelers on roadways. The heavy, wet snow and ice may down trees and power lines with localized power outages possible.


    Please monitor local TV and radio broadcasts for updates on this developing winter weather situation


    POWER OUTAGES
    There are 19,700 customers without power in Tennessee over five counties. This is down from around 36,000 without power last night. This total includes: Cumberland (14,000); Fentress (2,500); Overton (700); Putnam (1,300) and White (1,200).


    SHELTERS
    The American Red Cross has six shelters open in five counties with 224 occupants:

    • Overton – Crawford, Wilson Elementary, 10 occupants
    • Putnam – Cookeville, First United Methodist Church, 36 occupants
    • Putnam – Monterey, First Baptist Church, 75 occupants
    • Cumberland – Crossville, Cumberland Fellowship Baptist Church, 146 occupants
    • White – Sparta, National Guard Armory, 36 occupants
    • Fentress – Jamestown, First Baptist Church, 8 occupants


    FATALITIES
    Tennessee has 30, confirmed, weather-related fatalities., Please note: This is the only information TEMA has regarding fatalities: county, gender, age and cause. If you need more information, please contact the local Emergency Medical Service, Medical Examiner, Emergency Management Agency or law enforcement of the county in which the fatality occurred.

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Campbell County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 76-year-old male, weather related
    - 32-year-old-male, weather related

    • Claiborne County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 63-year-old male, weather related
    - 53-year-old male, weather related

    • Cumberland County – One (1) fatality: 83-year-old male, carbon monoxide poisoning

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Haywood County – One (1) fatality: 40-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 64-year-old female, hypothermia related
    - 69-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Hickman County One (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment

    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities:

    - 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    - 75-year-old male, fire
    - 68-year-old female, fire
    - 47-year-old male, fire

    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia

    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Polk County – One (1) fatality: 79-year-old male, weather related

    • Roane County – One (1) fatality: 44-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality: 85-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sevier – Two (2) fatalities,

    - 70-year-old female, weather related;
    - Male (age unknown), weather related

    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities:

    - 48-year-old male, hypothermia related
    - Male (age unknown), hypothermia related
    - (Demographics unknown), hypothermia related

    • Sumner County – One (1) fatality: Male, 60s, weather related

    • Wayne County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, weather related

    • Weakley County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, fall, hypothermia related

    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 34-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    - 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservation, Correction, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission, www.tnema.org, is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    February 24, 2015

    TEMA’s 6 p.m. Update on Tennessee’s State of Emergency


    This is TEMA’s 6 p.m. update on the State of Emergency in Tennessee. This will be the final update today, unless there are significant developments this evening. Please note the Forecast section as we do have the possibility of winter precipitation moving back into Tennessee Wednesday. Be sure to check your local forecast for weather developments and potential hazards. -Dean


    CURRENT SITUATION
    Tennessee remains at a Level II-State of Emergency, since 3 p.m., CST on Feb. 21, 2015. The original elevation to a Level III – State of Emergency for this winter storm was at 9 p.m. on Feb. 16, 2015.


    A number of state agencies were present in the Upper Cumberland region today to do emergency clearance of debris, support shelter missions, conduct welfare checks and work traffic issues.


    State agencies are also working in West and Middle Tennessee to check roads, assist counties and taek care of life safety issues.


    There is a potential for more winter precipitation moving into Tennessee Wednesday.


    WEATHER FORECAST
    West Tennessee will be in the high 30’s and partly cloudy. There is a ninety percent chance of snow Wednesday evening.


    Middle Tennessee-A Winter Weather Advisory will be in effect from noon Wednesday to 6 a.m. Thursday with the possible snow accumulation of 1-2 inches. Low 40’s and partly cloudy today and low 20’s tonight; the rest of the week will remain in the high 30’s. A Winter Storm Warning will be in effect at noon for Middle Tennessee counties along the Alabama border. Wayne, Lawrence, Giles east to Grundy could see 2 to 4 inches of snow.


    East Tennessee-Winter Storm Watch will be in effect from Wednesday afternoon through Thursday. Weather will remain partly cloudy with high in the 30’s today with lows in the 20’s tonight. There is a possibility of showers Wednesday evening with an accumulation of 1-3 inches, or more. Winter Storm Warning in effect as of 4 p.m. Wednesday.


    POWER OUTAGES
    There are 32,600 customers without power in Tennessee over six counties: Cumberland (16,000); Fentress (2,700); Meigs (9,000); Overton (1,000); Putnam (1,600); White (1,311); Morgan (1,000)


    SHELTERS
    The American Red Cross has six shelters open in five counties with 224 occupants:
    • Overton – Crawford, Wilson Elementary, 10 occupants
    • Putnam – Cookeville, First United Methodist Church, 36 occupants
    • Putnam – Monterey, First Baptist Church, 75 occupants
    • Cumberland – Crossville, Cumberland Fellowship Baptist Church, 146 occupants
    • White – Sparta, National Guard Armory, 36 occupants
    • Fentress – Jamestown, First Baptist Church, 8 occupants


    FATALITIES
    Tennessee has 30, confirmed, weather-related fatalities., Please note: This is the only information TEMA has regarding fatalities: county, gender, age and cause. If you need more information, please contact the local Emergency Medical Service, Medical Examiner, Emergency Management Agency or law enforcement of the county in which the fatality occurred.

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Campbell County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 76-year-old male, weather related
    - 32-year-old-male, weather related

    • Claiborne County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 63-year-old male, weather related
    - 53-year-old male, weather related

    • Cumberland County – One (1) fatality: 83-year-old male, carbon monoxide poisoning

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Haywood County – One (1) fatality: 40-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 64-year-old female, hypothermia related
    - 69-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Hickman County One (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment

    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities:

    - 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    - 75-year-old male, fire
    - 68-year-old female, fire
    - 47-year-old male, fire

    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia

    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Polk County – One (1) fatality: 79-year-old male, weather related

    • Roane County – One (1) fatality: 44-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality: 85-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sevier – Two (2) fatalities,

    - 70-year-old female, weather related;
    - Male (age unknown), weather related

    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities:

    - 48-year-old male, hypothermia related
    - Male (age unknown), hypothermia related
    - (Demographics unknown), hypothermia related

    • Sumner County – One (1) fatality: Male, 60s, weather related

    • Wayne County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, weather related

    • Weakley County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, fall, hypothermia related

    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 34-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    - 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservation, Correction, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission, www.tnema.org, is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    TEMA’s 2 p.m. Update on State of Emergency in Tennessee


    This is TEMA’s 2 p.m., CST, update on the State of Emergency in Tennessee. We now have 30 confirmed, weather-related fatalities in Tennessee.


    CURRENT SITUATION
    Tennessee remains at a Level II-State of Emergency, since 3 p.m., CST on Feb. 21, 2015. The original elevation to a Level III – State of Emergency for this winter storm was at 9 p.m. on Feb. 16, 2015.


    Snow fell across the Cumberland Plateau (up to 1 inch) and East Tennessee (up 4 inches). Temperatures are expected to be in the 20s today for most of the state.


    A number of state agencies continue to work in the Upper Cumberland region today to do emergency clearance of debris, support shelter missions, conduct welfare checks and work traffic issues.


    RESPONSE ACTIONS
    • Multiple chainsaw crews are scheduled to work in seven (7) counties today: White, Putnam, Overton, Cumberland, Fentress, Morgan, Scott and Roane. Crews include personnel from the Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee Division of Forestry and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.
    • The Tennessee National Guard has deployed 20 personnel to the Cumberland Plateau to assist with emergency debris clearing. Also, six Humvee teams will be conducting wellness checks and assisting local and state officials with emergency debris removal in the response in Putnam County and Cumberland Plateau. Another 25 Army and Air National Guardsmen will be at the Cookeville Amory on Sunday with 12, 10-ton dump trucks for debris removal in Cumberland Plateau area.
    • THP are still running highways to assist motorists, helping chainsaw crews access affected areas; and working emergency communications restoration issues.


    POWER OUTAGES
    There are 32,600 customers without power in Tennessee over six counties: Cumberland (16,000); Fentress (2,700); Meigs (9,000); Overton (1,000); Putnam (1,600); White (1,311); Morgan (1,000)


    SHELTERS
    The American Red Cross has six shelters open in five counties with 309 occupants:
    • Overton – Crawford, Wilson Elementary, 10 occupants
    • Putnam – Cookeville, First United Methodist Church, 36 occupants
    • Putnam – Monterey, First Baptist Church, 75 occupants
    • Cumberland – Crossville, Cumberland Fellowship Baptist Church, 146 occupants
    • White – Sparta, National Guard Armory, 36 occupants
    • Fentress – Jamestown, First Baptist Church, 8 occupants


    FATALITIES
    Tennessee has 30, confirmed, weather-related fatalities., Please note: This is the only information TEMA has regarding fatalities: county, gender, age and cause. If you need more information, please contact the local Emergency Medical Service, Medical Examiner, Emergency Management Agency or law enforcement of the county in which the fatality occurred.

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Campbell County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 76-year-old male, weather related
    - 32-year-old-male, weather related

    • Claiborne County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 63-year-old male, weather related
    - 53-year-old male, weather related

    • Cumberland County – One (1) fatality: 83-year-old male, carbon monoxide poisoning

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Haywood County – One (1) fatality: 40-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 64-year-old female, hypothermia related
    - 69-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Hickman County One (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment

    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities:

    - 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    - 75-year-old male, fire
    - 68-year-old female, fire
    - 47-year-old male, fire

    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia

    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Polk County – One (1) fatality: 79-year-old male, weather related

    • Roane County – One (1) fatality: 44-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality: 85-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sevier – Two (2) fatalities,

    - 70-year-old female, weather related;
    - Male (age unknown), weather related

    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities:

    - 48-year-old male, hypothermia related
    - Male (age unknown), hypothermia related
    - (Demographics unknown), hypothermia related

    • Sumner County – One (1) fatality: Male, 60s, weather related

    • Wayne County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, weather related

    • Weakley County – One (1) fatality: 82-year-old male, fall, hypothermia related

    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 34-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    - 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservation, Correction, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission, www.tnema.org, is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    February 23, 2015

    TEMA Late Update on Total Fatalities


    Tennessee remains at a Level II-State of Emergency, since 3 p.m., CST on Feb. 21, 2015. The original elevation to a Level III – State of Emergency for this winter storm was at 9 p.m. on Feb. 16, 2015. This is a late update on the confirmed, weather-related fatalities in Tennessee, which have increased to 27. This will be the final update today, unless there are significant events this evening or overnight.


    FATALITIES
    Tennessee has 27, confirmed, weather-related fatalities:

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Campbell County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 76-year-old male, weather related
    - 32-year-old-male, weather related

    • Claiborne County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 63-year-old male, weather related
    - 53-year-old male, weather related

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Haywood County – One (1) fatality: 40-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 64-year-old female, hypothermia related
    - 69-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Hickman County One (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment

    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities:

    - 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    - 75-year-old male, fire
    - 68-year-old female, fire
    - 47-year-old male, fire

    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia

    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Polk County – One (1) fatality: 79-year-old male, weather related

    • Roane County – One (1) fatality: 44-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality: 85-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sevier – Two (2) fatalities,

    - 70-year-old female, weather related;
    - Male (age unknown), weather related

    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities:

    - 48-year-old male, hypothermia related
    - Male (age unknown), hypothermia related
    - (Demographics unknown), hypothermia related

    • Sumner County – One (1) fatality: Male, 60s, weather related

    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 34-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    - 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    TEMA 5 p.m. Update on Tennessee State of Emergency


    This is TEMA’s 5 p.m. status update on Tennessee’s State of Emergency. There are now 26 confirmed, weather-related fatalities. Details are below. Please also note the key information regarding food safety during and after power outages.


    CURRENT SITUATION
    Tennessee remains at a Level II-State of Emergency, since 3 p.m., CST on Feb. 21, 2015. The original elevation to a Level III – State of Emergency for this winter storm was at 9 p.m. on Feb. 16, 2015.


    A number of state agencies are working in the Upper Cumberland region to do emergency clearance of debris, support shelter missions, conduct welfare checks and work traffic issues.


    RESPONSE ACTIONS
    • Civil Air Patrol conducted two flights over the Cumberland Plateau in Scott, Morgan, Fentress and Cumberland counties to survey damage.
    • Chainsaw crews from the Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee Division of Forestry and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster deployed to eight counties today in the Cumberland Plateau. Debris teams report progress on emergency debris clearing.
    • The National Guard has three personnel in Sparta Amory and four crew members assisting with chainsaw clearing missions.
    • TEMA’s East, Middle and West Regional offices continue to poll counties for situational updates and to provide assistance to local EMAs and officials.


    POWER OUTAGES
    There are 34, 262 customers without power in Tennessee over six counties: Bledsoe (220); Cumberland (20,000); Fentress (8,555); Overton (1,176); Putnam (1,000); White (1,311); Morgan (1000); and Scott (1000).


    SHELTERS
    The American Red Cross has seven shelters open in five counties with 311 occupants:

    • Overton – Livingston, First Baptist Church, 10 occupants
    • Overton – Crawford, Wilson Elementary, 0 occupants
    • Putnam – Cookeville, First United Methodist Church, 36 occupants
    • Putnam – Monterey, First Baptist Church, 75 occupants
    • Cumberland – Crossville, Cumberland Fellowship Baptist Church, 146 occupants
    • White – Sparta, National Guard Armory, 36 occupants
    • Fentress – Jamestown, First Baptist Church, 8 occupants


    FATALITIES
    Tennessee has 26, confirmed, weather-related fatalities:

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Campbell County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 76-year-old male, weather related
    - 32-year-old-male, weather related

    • Claiborne County – Two (2) fatalities

    - 63-year-old male, weather related
    - 53-year-old male, weather related

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Haywood County – One (1) fatality: 40-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 64-year-old female, hypothermia related
    - 69-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Hickman County One (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment

    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities:

    - 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    - 75-year-old male, fire
    - 68-year-old female, fire
    - 47-year-old male, fire

    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia

    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Roane County – One (1) fatality: 44-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality: 85-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sevier – Two (2) fatalities,

    - 70-year-old female, weather related;
    - Male (age unknown), weather related

    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities:

    - 48-year-old male, hypothermia related;
    - Male (age unknown), hypothermia related;
    - (Demographics unknown), hypothermia related

    • Sumner County – One (1) fatality: Male, 60s, weather related

    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 34-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    - 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    KEY MESSAGE

    Here are basic tips for keeping food safe when the Power Goes Out.

    • Keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible to maintain the cold temperature.

    o The refrigerator will keep food cold for about 4 hours if it is unopened.
    o A full freezer will keep the temperature for approximately 48 hours (24 hours if it is half full) if the door remains closed.
    o Buy dry or block ice to keep the refrigerator as cold as possible if the power is going to be out for a prolonged period of time. Fifty pounds of dry ice should hold an 18-cubic foot fully-stocked freezer cold for two days.

    • If you plan to eat refrigerated or frozen meat, poultry, fish or eggs while it is still at safe temperatures, it’s important that each item is thoroughly cooked to the proper temperature to assure that any foodborne bacteria that may be present is destroyed. However, if at any point the food was above 40 °F for 2 hours or more — discard it.
    • Wash fruits and vegetables with water from a safe source before eating.
    • For infants, try to use prepared, canned baby formula that requires no added water. When using concentrated or powdered formulas, prepare with bottled water if the local water source is potentially contaminated.


    Once Power is Restored
    You’ll need to determine the safety of your food. Here’s how:

    • If an appliance thermometer was kept in the freezer, check the temperature when the power comes back on. If the freezer thermometer reads 40°F or below, the food is safe and may be refrozen.
    • If a thermometer has not been kept in the freezer, check each package of food to determine its safety. You can’t rely on appearance or odor. If the food still contains ice crystals or is 40 °F or below, it is safe to refreeze or cook.
    • Refrigerated food should be safe as long as the power was out for no more than 4 hours and the refrigerator door was kept shut. Discard any perishable food (such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs or leftovers) that has been above 40°F for two hours or more.


    Keep in mind that perishable food such as meat, poultry, seafood, milk, and eggs that are not kept adequately refrigerated or frozen may cause illness if consumed, even when they are thoroughly cooked.


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservation, Correction, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission, www.tnema.org, is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    TEMA’s 10 a.m. Update on State of Emergency


    This is TEMA’s 10 a.m., CST, update on Tennessee’s State of Emergency.


    CURRENT SITUATION
    Tennessee remains at a Level II-State of Emergency, since 3 p.m., CST on Feb. 21, 2015. The original elevation to a Level III – State of Emergency for this winter storm was at 9 p.m. on Feb. 16, 2015.


    Fog on the Cumberland Plateau was an impediment to many response efforts on the Cumberland Plateau yesterday, preventing Civil Air Patrol and Tennessee Highway Patrol reconnaissance flights over the area. The conditions also put THP’s plans on hold to conduct rolling road blocks on Interstate 40 for power restoration missions.


    FORECAST
    West Tennessee will be in the high 20’s and mostly cloudy. Winter Weather Advisory remains in effect till 6 p.m. this evening; possibility of snow, sleet and ice accumulations of less than one tenth of an inch. Middle Tennessee will be in the high 20’s and mostly cloudy today and low 20’s tonight. Flood Advisory remains in effect for Clarksville. East Tennessee will remain partly cloudy with high in the 40’s today with lows in the 20’s tonight. There is a possibility of snow late tonight and into Tuesday with an accumulation of 1 to 2 inches.


    RESPONSE ACTIONS
    • Chainsaw crews from the Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee Division of Forestry and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster deployed to eight counties today in the Cumberland Plateau. Chainsaw crews will be out again today with additional teams from the Tennessee National Guard.

    • The Tennessee National Guard has deployed 20 personnel to the Cumberland Plateau to do debris management, 6 Humvee teams will be conducting wellness checks and assist local and state officials in the response in Putnam County.

    • TEMA’s East, Middle and West Regional offices continue to poll counties for situational updates and to provide assistance to local EMAs and officials.


    FATALITIES (Since Feb. 16, 2015)
    Tennessee has 22, confirmed, weather-related fatalities:

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Haywood County – One (1) fatality: 40-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 64-year-old female, hypothermia related
    - 69-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Hickman County One (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment

    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities:

    - 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    - 75-year-old male, fire
    - 68-year-old female, fire
    - 47-year-old male, fire

    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia

    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Roane County – One (1) fatality: 44-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality: 85-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sevier – Two (2) fatalities,

    - 70-year-old female, weather related;
    - Male (age unknown), weather related

    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities:

    - 48-year-old male, hypothermia related;
    - Male (age unknown), hypothermia related;
    - (Demographics unknown), hypothermia related

    • Sumner County – One (1) fatality: Male, 60s, weather related

    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 34-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    - 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    POWER OUTAGES
    There are 34, 262 customers without power in Tennessee over six counties: Bledsoe (220); Cumberland (20,000); Fentress (8,555); Overton (1,176); Putnam (1,000); White (1,311); Morgan (1000); and Scott (1000).


    SHELTERS
    The American Red Cross has seven shelters open in five counties with 311 occupants:
    • Overton – Livingston, First Baptist Church, 10 occupants
    • Overton – Crawford, Wilson Elementary, 0 occupants
    • Putnam – Cookeville, First United Methodist Church, 36 occupants
    • Putnam – Monterey, First Baptist Church, 75 occupants
    • Cumberland – Crossville, Cumberland Fellowship Baptist Church, 146 occupants
    • White – Sparta, National Guard Armory, 36 occupants
    • Fentress – Jamestown, First Baptist Church, 8 occupants


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservation, Correction, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    February 22, 2015

    TEMA’s 5 p.m. Update on Tennessee State of Emergency


    This is TEMA’s 5 p.m. update on Tennessee’s State of Emergency. Please note the confirmed, weather-related fatality total in Tennessee increased to 22 this afternoon. Details are below. This will be the last update today, unless we have significant developments this evening or overnight.


    CURRENT SITUATION
    Tennessee remains at a Level II-State of Emergency, since 3 p.m., CST on Feb. 21, 2015. The original elevation to a Level III – State of Emergency for this winter storm was at 9 p.m. on Feb. 16, 2015.


    Fog on the Cumberland Plateau was an impediment to many response efforts on the Cumberland Plateau today, preventing Civil Air Patrol and Tennessee Highway Patrol reconnaissance flights over the area. The conditions also put THP’s plans on hold to conduct rolling road blocks on Interstate 40 for power restoration missions.


    FORECAST
    West Tennessee is expecting more winter weather tonight with snow, possibly up to a ½ inch, falling around 9 p.m., CST. Middle Tennessee has Flood Advisories in effect for a number of counties, including Montgomery, Robertson, Davidson, Williamson, Hickman, Giles and Perry counties. Winter Weather Advisories are in place for Hardin, Lincoln, Moore and Franklin counties. East Tennessee can expect fog overnight and Monday morning. Visibility of 1 mile or less can be expected. Driving will be hazardous on local roads and highways due to reduced visibility and black ice.


    RESPONSE ACTIONS
    • The SEOC coordinated the delivery of generators to Putnam and Cumberland counties to assist with water system power outages. Two generators are at the Monterery Water Plant on stand-by. Another generator is being transported from Chattanooga to the Catoosa area of Cumberland County for the Crossville Water System.

    • Chainsaw crews from the Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Civil Air Patrol and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster deployed to eight counties today in the Cumberland Plateau. Chainsaw crews will be out again Monday with additional teams from the Tennessee National Guard.

    • The Tennessee National Guard has deployed 10 units with 20 personnel to the Cumberland Plateau to do wellness checks and assist local and state officials in the response.

    • The Tennessee Highway Patrol (THP) has deployed a strike team to White County to assist the County and has sent two troopers to Overton County for traffic support.

    • TEMA’s East, Middle and West Regional offices continue to poll counties for situational updates and to provide assistance to local EMAs and officials.


    FATALITIES (Since Feb. 16, 2015)
    Tennessee has 22, confirmed, weather-related fatalities:

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Haywood County – One (1) fatality: 40-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 64-year-old female, hypothermia related
    - 69-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Hickman County One (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment

    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities:

    - 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    - 75-year-old male, fire
    - 68-year-old female, fire
    - 47-year-old male, fire

    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia

    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Roane County – One (1) fatality: 44-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality: 85-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sevier – Two (2) fatalities,

    - 70-year-old female, weather related;
    - Male (age unknown), weather related

    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities:

    - 48-year-old male, hypothermia related
    - Male (age unknown), hypothermia related
    - (Demographics unknown), hypothermia related

    • Sumner County – One (1) fatality: Male, 60s, weather related

    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 34-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    - 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    POWER OUTAGES
    There are 32, 698 customers without power in Tennessee over seven counties: Bledsoe (220); Cumberland (20,000); Fentress (8,555); Monroe (236); Overton (1,176); Putnam (1,200); and White (1,311).


    SHELTERS
    The American Red Cross has seven shelters open in five counties with 311 occupants:

    • Overton – Livingston, First Baptist Church, 10 occupants
    • Overton – Crawford, Wilson Elementary, 0 occupants
    • Putnam – Cookeville, First United Methodist Church, 36 occupants
    • Putnam – Monterey, First Baptist Church, 75 occupants
    • Cumberland – Crossville, Cumberland Fellowship Baptist Church, 146 occupants
    • White – Sparta, National Guard Armory, 36 occupants
    • Fentress – Jamestown, First Baptist Church, 8 occupants


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance Environment & Conservation, Correction, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    Noon Update on Tennessee State of Emergency


    The following information on Tennessee’s State of Emergency is as of 12 p.m., CST, on Feb. 22, 2015.


    CURRENT SITUATION
    Tennessee is at a Level II-State of Emergency due to the major impacts to infrastructure, power and roads from Saturday’s snow and ice storm. The largest area impact Saturday, with significant power outages and debris, is Tennessee’s Cumberland Plateau, particularly the counties of Cumberland, Fentress, Morgan, Overton, Scott, Putnam, Roane and White. There were no notifications to the SEOC overnight, though, of additional issues or damage in the state.


    The major threats toady will include ice, downed power lines, flooding and debris.


    RESPONSE ACTIONS
    • The Tennessee National Guard has deployed 10 units with 20 personnel to the Cumberland Plateau to do wellness checks and assist local and state officials in the response.

    • The Tennessee Highway Patrol (THP) has deployed a strike team to White County to assist the County and has sent two troopers to Overton County for traffic support.

    • Multiple chainsaw crews are scheduled to work in eight (8) counties (White, Putnam, Overton, Cumberland, Fentress, Morgan, Scott and Roane) today to clear debris. The crews are staffed with personnel from the Tennessee Division of Forestry, Department of Transportation, Civil Air Patrol (CAP) and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD). The Salvation Army is also providing meal support to the CAP and VOAD crews.

    • TEMA’s East, Middle and West Regional offices continue to poll counties for situational updates and to provide assistance to local EMAs and officials.


    POWER OUTAGES
    There are 44,139 customers without power in Tennessee over seven counties: Bledsoe (220); Cumberland (22,639); Fentress (8,555); Monroe (582); Overton (1,176); Putnam (9,656); and White (1,311).


    SHELTERS
    Currently there are nine (9) shelters open statewide with 373 occupants.


    PRIORITIES
    • Address life safety needs and support local government assistance requests
    • Assess and address roadway conditions, and assist stranded motorists
    • Monitor changes to weather conditions and conduct sheltering operations


    FORECAST
    A Flood Watch will be in effect the rest of the weekend for the Duck River, Buffalo River, Harpeth River, Stones River, Red River, and Cumberland Basins. A Flood Warning is in effect in Cheatham and Hickman counties, along with a Flood Advisory in Montgomery County.


    FATALITIES (Since Feb. 16, 2015)
    Tennessee has 21, confirmed, weather-related fatalities:

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Haywood County – One (1) fatality: 40-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 64-year-old female, hypothermia related
    - 69-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Hickman County One (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment

    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities:

    - 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident;
    - 75-year-old male, fire;
    - 68-year-old female, fire;
    - 47-year-old male, fire

    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia

    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident

    • Roane County – One (1) fatality: 44-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality: 85-year-old male, hypothermia related

    • Sevier – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 70-year-old female, weather related
    - Male (age unknown), weather related

    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities:

    - 48-year-old male, hypothermia related
    - Male (age unknown), hypothermia related
    - (Demographics unknown), hypothermia related

    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities:

    - 34-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    - 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance Environment & Conservations, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, FEMA, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission, www.tnema.org, is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    February 21, 2015

    TEMA 10 p.m. Update on Fatalities


    TEMA added three, confirmed, weather-related fatalities this evening. Below is an updated list.


    Tennessee elevated to a Level II – State of Emergency, at 3 p.m., CST, on Feb. 21, 2015, after being at a Level III – State of Emergency since 9 p.m., CST, on Feb. 16, 2015.


    Tennessee has 21, confirmed, weather-related fatalities (since Feb. 16, 2015):

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Haywood County – One (1) fatality: 40-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities: 64-year-old female, hypothermia related; 69-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Hickman County (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment
    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities: 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident; 75-year-old male, fire; 68-year-old female, fire; 47-year-old male, fire
    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia
    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    • Roane County – One (1) fatality, 44-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality, 85-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Sevier – Two (2) fatalities, 70-year-old female, hypothermia related; (age unknown) male, hypothermia related
    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities: 48-year-old male, hypothermia related; (age unknown) male, hypothermia related; (demographics unknown), hypothermia related
    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities: 34-year-old female; 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    7 p.m. Update on Tennessee State of Emergency


    This is TEMA’s 7 p.m. update on the State of Emergency. This will be the final report today, unless we received reports of significant developments this evening or overnight.


    CURRENT SITUATION
    Tennessee has elevated to a Level II-State of Emergency due to the major impacts to infrastructure, power and roads as a result of the overnight snow and ice storm and the current heavy rain in the state.


    The heaviest impacts are in the Cumberland Plateau area of Tennessee with heavy damage reports and power outages in Cumberland, Fentress, Overton, Putnam and White counties.


    Claiborne County EMA is reporting a number of roof collapses but no reports of injuries. Monterey water plant in Putnam County has requested a generator for power needs. The SEOC is working to fulfill this request.


    West Tennessee is reporting scattered rain and possible icing conditions, with scattered power outages. The weather forecast is calling for the rain to move out overnight Saturday. It will still be windy and cold making travel hazardous on Interstates and increasing the likelihood of more power outages.


    RESPONSE ACTIONS
    TEMA’s East, Middle and West region offices continue to poll counties for status updates and requests for assistance.


    Tennessee National Guard has five Humvee teams, with 10 staff members deployed to the Cumberland Plateau to work wellness checks. The National Guard also has opened a shelter at its Armory in Sparta.


    Tennessee Highway Patrol is conducting life safety checks.


    Tennessee Division of Forestry has 20 chainsaw crews working in Putnam and Cumberland counties to clear debris. Another three crews are in Morgan County and another four crews are in Scott County. TDOT and VOAD also are assisting with chainsaw crews.


    The American Red Cross and Tennessee Department of Human Services are identifying needs for mass sheltering due to power outages and mass feeding missions.


    TEMA has set up a Shelter Management Task Force and a Debris Management Task Force to work with key state and private sector partners to identify areas of priority and dispatch personnel.


    Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency is doing wellness checks along I-40 on the Cumberland Plateau, and in White County.


    Tennessee State Parks reports trees down and power issues at Fall Creek Falls, Duck Island, Pickett and Cumberland Mountain state parks.


    Tennessee Commission on Aging and Disability is sending a support team to the Jamestown Community Center.


    Power Outages
    Power outages are around 48,000 customers statewide with 44,000 in the Cumberland Plateau area alone.


    Shelters Open (10)

    • Overton County-Livingston-First Christian Church; Crawford-Wilson Elementary School; Crawford-Mountain View Fire Department (Staging Area Only)
    • Putnam County-Cookeville-First United Methodist Church; Monterey-First Baptist Church
    • Cumberland County-Crossville-Cumberland Fellowship Baptist Church
    • White County-Sparta-National Guard
    • Fentress County-Jamestown-Jamestown Community Center; Jamestown-First Baptist Church, Signature Health Care of Fentress County


    Fatalities(Since Feb. 16, 2015)
    Tennessee has 18, confirmed, weather-related fatalities:

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities: 64-year-old female, hypothermia related; 69-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Hickman County (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment
    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities: 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident; 75-year-old male, fire; 68-year-old female, fire; 47-year-old male, fire
    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia
    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    • Roane County – One (1) fatality, 44-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality, 85-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities: 48-year-old male, hypothermia related; (age unknown) male, hypothermia related; (age unknown) male, hypothermia related
    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities: 34-year-old female; 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Environment & Conservation, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Commissioner on Aging, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee State Parks, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, FEMA, National Weather Service, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission, www.tnema.org, is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    Tennessee Elevates to Level II – State of Emergency


    CURRENT SITUATION

    Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has accepted the recommendation of TEMA Deputy Commissioner David Purkey to elevate to a Level II-State of Emergency in recognizing a major disaster in Tennessee.


    The Level II – State of Emergency activation is effective as of 3 p.m., CST, on 2/21/15. The SEOC is receiving reports of major impacts to infrastructure, power and roads as a result of the overnight snow and ice storm and the current heavy rain in the state.


    Definition of Level II – State of Emergency
    A major disaster as defined by TCA 58-2-101 as an event that will likely exceed local capabilities and require a broad range of state and federal assistance. The TEMP and the SEOC are activated in accordance with TCA 58-2-107(b)(2), and a decision by the Governor or his representative (Director of TEMA) declares a state of emergency. The full staff or most of the staff of the SEOC is activated, typically in a 24-hour continuous operation. This disaster may meet eligibility requirements for a federal disaster declaration under the provisions of the Stafford Act.


    The heaviest impacts are in the Cumberland Plateau area of Tennessee with heavy damage reports and power outages in Cumberland, Fentress, Overton, Putnam and White counties.


    Rain has diminished in West Tennessee but temperatures are expected to fall into the 20s tonight, resulting in slick roads, with a chance of snow on Sunday. In Middle Tennessee and East Tennessee are reporting heavy rain and ice and snow still on the ground in many areas.


    RESPONSE ACTIONS
    Tennessee National Guard as two Humvee crews, with four staff members, working on wellness checks in White County with another three crews, and six staff members, to be deployed.


    Tennessee Highway Patrol reports slow-moving traffic in both directions on I-40 at the 301 to 320 mile-markers. Hwy. 70 in White County, Hwy. 84 in Morgan County, U.S. 70 in Putnam County, from Cookeville to Monterey, are all reporting road issues.


    Tennessee Division of Forestry has 20 chainsaw crews working in Putnam and Cumberland counties to clear debris. Another three crews are in Morgan County and another four crews are in Scott County. TDOT and VOAD also are assisting with chainsaw crews.


    The American Red Cross and Tennessee Department of Human Services are identifying needs for mass sheltering due to power outages and mass feeding missions.


    TEMA has set up a Shelter Management Task Force and a Debris Management Task Force to work with key state and private sector partners to identify areas of priority and dispatch personnel .


    Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency is doing wellness checks on I-40 on the Cumberland Plateau and in White County.


    Power Outages
    Power outages have increased to just over 50,459 customers in 12 counties, including Cumberland (22,631), Fentress (10,557), Putnam (9,657), Franklin (1,903), White (1,560) and Overton (1,175)


    Fatalities (Since Feb. 16, 2015)
    Tennessee has 18, confirmed, weather-related fatalities:

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities: 64-year-old female, hypothermia related; 69-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Hickman County (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment
    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities: 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident; 75-year-old male, fire; 68-year-old female, fire; 47-year-old male, fire
    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia
    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    • Roane County – One (1) fatality, 44-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality, 85-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities: 48-year-old male, hypothermia related; (age unknown) male, hypothermia related; (demographics unknown), hypothermia related
    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities: 34-year-old female; 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservation, Finance & Administration, General Services, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, FEMA, National Weather Service, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    February 20, 2015

    TEMA 4 p.m. Update on State of Emergency


    This is TEMA’s update on the State of Emergency in Tennessee. There are 18 fatalities confirmed in Tennessee as weather-related. Please see details below. This will be the final update today unless the situation changes in Tennessee due to weather conditions or counties begin requesting assistance.


    CURRENT SITUATION


    Tennessee remains at a Level III- State of Emergency, declared at 9 p.m. on 2/16/15.


    A band of patchy snow and sleet was moving eastward across parts of Middle Tennessee this afternoon.
    A Winter Storm Warning remains in place for West Tennessee; an Ice Storm Warning is in place for Middle Tennessee; and, a Winter Storm Warning and a Winter Weather Advisory will be in effect later for East Tennessee.


    The National Weather Service expects, given the rain potential and timing, to issue a Flood Watch from 6 a.m., CST Saturday until noon Sunday. The Flood Watch will be for all of Middle Tennessee except Wayne, Lawrence and Giles Counties.


    Major Threats through Sunday
    Severe Cold – Snow – Freezing Rain & Sleet – Downed Power Lines – Flash Flooding


    Fatalities (Since Feb. 16, 2015)
    Tennessee has 18, confirmed, weather-related fatalities:

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities: 64-year-old female, hypothermia related; 69-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Hickman County (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment
    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities: 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident; 75-year-old male, fire; 68-year-old female, fire; 47-year-old male, fire
    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia
    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    • Roane County – One (1) fatality, 44-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality, 85-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Shelby County – Three (3) fatalities: 48-year-old male, hypothermia related; (age unknown) male, hypothermia related; (demographics unknown), hypothermia related
    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities: 34-year-old female; 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    Power Outages
    Power outages have not changed since this morning with just over 2,700 customers without power.


    Shelters Open
    A total of five shelters are open with 38 occupants as follows:

    • Independent: two shelters open with 11 occupants, in Clarksville and Niota


    Interstates
    Interstates are moving in Tennessee but TDOT traffic boards note drivers need to be aware that bridges and overpasses could be slick.


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Environment & Conservations; Finance & Administration, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, FEMA, National Weather Service, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    TEMA Update on State of Emergency


    This is TEMA’s 1 p.m., CST, update on the State of Emergency in Tennessee. There are 17, confirmed, weather-related fatalities in the state since Feb. 16, 2015.


    CURRENT SITUATION


    Tennessee remains at a Level III- State of Emergency, declared at 9 p.m. on 2/16/15.


    A Winter Storm Warning is in effect for West Tennessee. And Ice Storm Warning is in effect for Middle Tennessee. A Winter Storm Warning and a Winter Weather Advisory will be in effect later today for East Tennessee.


    Reports of snowfall, sleet and freezing drizzle are coming in from West Tennessee, with temperatures in the 20s. THP reports more wrecks in the region with roads covered in ice. TDOT crews are out inspecting roads and treating as needed. Middle Tennessee could see freezing rain on its western edge between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m., CST, and significant ice accumulations are possible in the northern half of the region. No issues currently reported in the Middle or East regions.


    Warmer air will begin moving in overnight Friday changing any snow, sleet and freezing rain to rain Saturday. Temperatures will rise into the 40s with rain possibilities continuing Sunday. The melting snow and ice, and the possibility of one to three inches of rain, increases the potential for flash flooding.


    Major Threats through Sunday
    Severe Cold – Snow – Freezing Rain & Sleet – Downed Power Lines – Flash Flooding


    Fatalities (Since Feb. 16, 2015)
    Tennessee has 17, confirmed, weather-related fatalities:

    • Benton County – One (1) fatality: 64-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities: 64-year-old female, hypothermia related; 69-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Hickman County (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment
    • Knox County – Four (4) fatalities: 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident; 75-year-old male, fire; 68-year-old female, fire; 47-year-old male, fire
    • Moore County – One (1) fatality: 73-year-old male, hypothermia
    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    • Roane County – One (1) fatality, 44-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality, 85-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Shelby County – Two (2) fatalities: 48-year-old male, hypothermia related; male, hypothermia related
    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities: 34-year-old female; 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    Power Outages
    Power outages have not changed since this morning with just over 2,700 customers without power.


    Shelters Open
    A total of five shelters are open with 38 occupants as follows:

    • Red Cross: three shelters open with 27 occupants, in Kingston, Maryville and Dyersburg
    • Independent: two shelters open with 11 occupants, in Clarksville and Niota


    Interstates
    Interstates are moving in Tennessee but TDOT traffic boards note drivers need to be aware that bridges and overpasses could be slick.


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Environment & Conservations; Finance & Administration, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, FEMA, National Weather Service, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    Update on Tennessee State of Emergency


    This is TEMA’s 9 a.m. update on the State of Emergency in Tennessee. We have confirmed 11, weather-related fatalities, details below. Power outages are below 3,000 in the state. We are monitoriting the incoming winter weather system and how it will impact life safety, road conditions and power outages. -Dean


    CURRENT SITUATION


    Tennessee remains at a Level III- State of Emergency, declared at 9 p.m. on 2/16/15.


    The main threats today will be impacts from the incoming snow, freezing, rain and sleet, which is already moving into West Tennessee this morning. This system may produce an inch or more of snow before changing over to freezing rain and sleet.


    A Winter Storm Warning is in effect for West Tennessee; an Ice Storm Warning is in place for Middle Tennessee, from noon until 9 p.m.; and a Winter Storm Warning & Advisory is in effect for East Tennessee.


    After midnight Friday, temperatures will begin to warm up with snow changing to sleet and freezing rain, and eventually to rain Saturday morning. Temperatures will rise into the 40s Saturday with rain continuing. This warming trend melting snow and ice, and the possibility of one to three inches of rain will increase the potential for flash flooding.


    Major Threats through Sunday
    Severe Cold – Snow – Freezing Rain & Sleet – Downed Power Lines – Flash Flooding


    Fatalities
    Tennessee has 11, confirmed, weather-related fatalities:

    Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related
    Henry County – Two (2) fatalities: 64-year-old female, hypothermia related; 69-year-old male, hypothermia related
    Hickman County (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment
    Knox County – One (1) fatality: 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    Roane County – One (1) fatality, 44-year-old male, hypothermia related
    Sequatchie – One (1) fatality, 85-year-old male, hypothermia related
    Shelby County – One (1) fatality: 48-year-old male, hypothermia related
    Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities: 34-year-old female; 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    Power Outages
    There are just over 2,700 customers without power this afternoon, down from 5,700 yesterday, over two counties with the highest outage in Monroe at 2,543 customers.


    Shelters Open
    A total of seven shelters are open with 55 occupants as follows:

    • Red Cross: four shelters open with 41 occupants, in Kingston, Maryville, Dyersburg and Pigeon Forge
    • Independent three shelters open with 11 occupants, in Clarksville, Madisonville and Niota


    Interstates
    Interstates are moving in Tennessee but TDOT traffic boards note drivers need to be aware that bridges and overpasses could be slick.


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Commerce & Insurance, Environment & Conservations; Finance & Administration, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Volunteer Tennessee. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, FEMA, National Weather Service, Tennessee Valley Authority and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster.


    KEY MESSAGES

    • Stay indoors as much as possible.
    • Be sure you have adequate clothing and blankets to keep you warm.
    • Check on your elderly friends and family members.
    • Bring pets and companion animals inside during winter weather.
    • If you do go outside, watch for signs of frostbite (loss of feeling and white or pale appearance in extremities) and hypothermia (uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness, and apparent exhaustion).
    • Seek warm shelter and medical treatment immediately for frostbite and hypothermia symptoms.
    • Patients with chronic health conditions who are having problems getting to treatment should notify their local emergency management agency (EMA) or emergency medical service (EMS) to arrange alternate transportation.
    • Do not attempt to drive or walk through high water – Turn Around, Don’t Drown.


    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.

    February 19, 2015

    TEMA Update on State of Emergency


    This is TEMA’s 4 p.m. update on the State of Emergency in Tennessee. We have confirmed 11 weather-related fatalities in the state. The details are below. We are monitoring the incoming winter weather system and its potential threats to life safety, traffic issues and power outages. This will be the final update today, unless there are significant changes this evening. We expect to issue the first update Friday around 9 a.m.


    CURRENT SITUATION
    Tennessee remains in a State of Emergency, declared at 9 p.m. on 2/16/15.


    Fatalities
    Tennessee has 11, confirmed, weather-related fatalities:

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities: 64-year-old female, hypothermia related; 69-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Hickman County (1) fatality: 67-year-old male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment
    • Knox County – One (1) fatality: 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    • Roane County – One (1) fatality, 44-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality, 85-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Shelby County – One (1) fatality: 48-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities: 34-year-old female; 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    Forecast
    Another winter storm will move across Tennessee, starting Friday morning and continuing through Saturday. A Winter Storm Warning is in place for Middle Tennessee through 9 a.m. Saturday. A Winter Storm Watch will be in effect for East Tennessee Friday afternoon. NWS predicts this incoming system could produce an inch or more of snow followed by heavy freezing rain and sleet.


    After midnight Friday, temperatures will begin to warm up with snow changing to sleet and freezing rain, and eventually to rain Saturday morning. Temperatures will rise into the 40s Saturday with rain continuing. This warming trend melting snow and ice, and the possibility of one to three inches of rain will increase the potential for flash flooding.


    Major Threats through Sunday
    Severe Cold – Snow – Freezing Rain & Sleet – Downed Power Lines – Flash Flooding


    Power Outages
    There are just over 5,700 customers without power this afternoon over five counties.


    Shelters Open
    Red Cross (7): Warren, Sevier, Roane, Maryville, Loudon, Knox, Dyer
    Independent (6): Madisonville, Loudon, Lewisburg, Coffee, McMinn, Rhea


    Interstates
    Interstates are moving in Tennessee but TDOT traffic boards note drivers need to be aware that patches of ice are possible.


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Environment & Conservations; Finance & Administration, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, FEMA, National Weather Service, Tennessee Valley Authority, Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster and Volunteer Tennessee.


    TEMA’s mission is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.


    TEMA Update on State of Emergency


    This is TEMA’s 2 p.m. update on the State of Emergency in Tennessee. We now have 10, confirmed, weather-related fatalities. Details below. Also, note the extended forecast information and the coming potential for significant rainfall this weekend.


    CURRENT SITUATION
    Tennessee remains in a State of Emergency, declared at 9 p.m. on 2/16/15.


    It remains very cold in Tennessee with wind chill and winter weather advisories in place. The National Weather Service (NWS) is watching for the potential of more winter weather moving across Tennessee Friday and Friday night. NWS predicts this incoming system could produce an inch or more of snow followed by heavy freezing rain and sleet.


    After midnight Friday, temperatures will begin to warm up with snow changing to sleet and freezing rain, and eventually to rain Saturday morning. Temperatures will rise into the 40s Saturday with rain continuing. This warming trend melting snow and ice, and the possibility of one to three inches of rain will increase the potential for flash flooding.


    Major Threats through Sunday
    Severe Cold – Snow – Freezing Rain & Sleet – Downed Power Lines – Flash Flooding


    Fatalities
    Tennessee has ten (10), confirmed, weather-related fatalities:

    • Hamilton County – One (1) fatality: 63-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Henry County – Two (2) fatalities: 64-year-old female, hypothermia related; 69-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Hickman County (1) fatality: male, dialysis patient, unable to get to treatment
    • Knox County – One (1) fatality: 30-year-old male, motor vehicle accident
    • Overton County – One (1) fatality: 38-year-old female, motor vehicle accident
    • Sequatchie – One (1) fatality, 85-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Shelby County – One (1) fatality: 48-year-old male, hypothermia related
    • Williamson County – Two (2) fatalities: 34-year-old female; 10-year-old male, motor vehicle accident


    Power Outages
    There are just over 6,300 customers without power this afternoon, down from more than 11,000 this morning, over six counties with the highest outage in Monroe at 5,693 customers.


    Shelters Open
    Red Cross (7): Warren, Sevier, Roane, Maryville, Loudon, Knox, Dyer
    Independent (6): Madisonville, Loudon, Lewisburg, Coffee, McMinn, Rhea


    Interstates
    Interstates are moving in Tennessee but TDOT traffic boards note drivers need to be aware that patches of ice are possible.


    State Agencies working the storm response include: Environment & Conservations; Finance & Administration, Health, Human Services, National Guard, Tennessee Division of Forestry, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Department of Transportation and Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Response support is also being provided from the American Red Cross, FEMA, National Weather Service, Tennessee Valley Authority, Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster and Volunteer Tennessee.


    KEY MESSAGES

    • Stay indoors as much as possible.
    • Be sure you have adequate clothing and blankets to keep you warm.
    • Check on your elderly friends and family members.
    • Bring pets and companion animals inside during winter weather.
    • If you do go outside, watch for signs of frostbite (loss of feeling and white or pale appearance in extremities) and hypothermia (uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness, and apparent exhaustion).
    • Seek warm shelter and medical treatment immediately for frostbite and hypothermia symptoms.
    • Do not attempt to drive or walk through high water – Turn Around, Don’t Drown.


    TEMA’s mission, www.tnema.org, is to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery from man-made, natural and technological hazards in a professional and efficient manner in concert with our stakeholders.